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CMRS Co-sponsored Lecture
“The Torah in the Language of the Ishmaelites: Reflections on Jewish Literary Production under Islam”
Tuesday, February 3, 2015

The medieval Islamic period brought about great intellectual growth, new models in writing, and a flowering of literary creativity in the Arabic language among the Jews. Jewish, Christian, and Muslim communities had Arabic as their common language and therefore naturally shared a similar cultural background. Often reading the same books and all speaking and writing in the same language, they created a unique intellectual commonality in which an ongoing, constant exchange of ideas, texts, and forms of discourse beyond communal barriers was the norm. Dr. Ronny Vollandt addresses and gives examples of the two directions, in which this literary exchange functioned, showing examples of Muslim and Christian texts that became influential among Jewish learned circles, and vice versa.

 


 

CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture
“Documenting Safe Conduct in the Middle Ages”
Tuesday, February 3, 2015

The early history of safe conduct has principally been studied as a question of protection—of merchants, students, ambassadors, soldiers, pilgrims, and other travelers in “foreign” jurisdictions. It is also a question, however, of information: how did officials know that a particular person had been granted safe conduct? Documents of safe conduct—less proto-passports than proto-visas—demonstrate the possibilities and problems of information processing in the pre-modern world. In this lecture, CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Adam Kosto, Professor of History at Columbia University and authority on the institutional and legal history of Western Europe, explores this topic.

  • Place: Royce 314
  • Time: 4:00 PM
  • Advance registration not required. No fee. Limited seating.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 


 

Workshop on Digital Tools for Exploring Medieval Charters
Wednesday, February 4, 2015

ChartEx: Tools for the Analysis of Medieval Charters is a collaborative digital humanities project developed as part of the second round of the Digging into Data Challenge. The core tools, still in development, are designed to "read" full text medieval documents (charters) using Natural Language Processing, identify persons and places in individual documents, and then propose relationships between the persons and places identified across a set of charters using data mining techniques. After an introduction to the project, students will have an opportunity to experiment with the annotation tool used to train the system, and with the virtual workbench used to analyze and manipulate the data.

Adam Kosto, Professor of History and Director of Graduate Studies at Columbia University in the City of New York, specializes in the institutional history of medieval Europe, with a focus on Catalonia and the Mediterranean. Professor Kosto is a CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar in the Deaprtment of History.

  • Place: Rolfe 2118
  • Time: 3:00 - 4:50 PM
  • Advance registration not required. No fee. Limited seating.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 


 

“Syncategoremata: The Prehistory of Logical Constants”
E.A. Moody Medieval Philosophy Workshop
Friday-Saturday, February 6-7, 2015

Organized by Professor Calvin Normore (UCLA).

Friday, February 6 in Public Affairs 2270:

3:00 p.m. Irène Rosier Catach, CNRS (Paris)
On the Early XIIth Discussion on ‘Consignificative Words’ in Logic and Grammar: Abelard, his Mater, and the Glosue in Priscianum

4:30 p.m. Christopher Martin, University of Auckland
The Analysis of Negation and the Conditional Connective as Syncategorematic Terms: (1) William of Sherwood and Peter of Spain

Saturday, February 7 in Royce 306:

9:30 a.m. Peter King, University of Toronto
Mostly ‘Most’

11:00 a.m. Henrik Lagerlund, University of Western Ontario
Modals

12:00 p.m. Lunch break

1:00 p.m. Mary J. SIrridge, Louisiana State University
‘Inquantum’ and Other Bad Actors

2:30 p.m. Mikko Yrjonsuuri, University of Jyvaskyla
Only the ‘Only’

4:00 p.m. Graziana Ciola, Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa
‘Si’? Si!

This conference is presented in memory of Ernest Moody, UCLA Professor of Philosophy from 1958-1975.

  • Advance registration not required. No fee. Limited seating.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 



CMRS Roundtable
“'If it agree not with the Text’: Lanyer’s Salve Deus and Biblical Translations in the Era of King James”
Wednesday, February 11, 2015

CMRS Associate Professor Andrew Fleck (San Jose State University) discusses his work.

  • Place: Royce 306
  • Time: 12:00 PM
  • Advance registration not required. No fee. Limited seating.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 


 

CMRS Shakespeare Symposium
“Touching Shakespeare: Proximity, Precarity, and Resilience in Renaissance Drama and Modern Life”
Friday-Saturday, February 13-14, 2015

Touch, sensing, and sensation are lively topics in the humanities right now. Touch intimates physical proximity and calls to mind the vulnerable body and the resilient flesh, even as it also carries tacit knowledge of the deep co-implication of physical and imaginative or intuitive aspects of proximity. The aim of this conference is to expose sensation to an existential and political triad of terms, by supplementing proximity, the emotional calculus of spatial closeness, with precarity—the forms of risk associated with economic, legal, or creaturely disability and interdependence— and with resilience—the responsive adaptation and accommodation to the physical and social environment by which individuals cope with precarity. In Shakespearean drama, the triad of proximity, precarity, and resilience concerns more than the on-going task of building sustainable relations between humans; it also entails recognition of the co-participation of human and nonhuman actors in the making of a habitable world. The plays of Shakespeare are documents of survival, prompts for improvisation, and exercises in pattern recognition with the capacity not only to inform us about the prior histories of proximity, precarity and resilience in relation to the senses, but also to aid us in our ongoing efforts to inhabit the spaces shaped by human effort, technological complexity, and environmental vulnerability today.

This symposium, organized by Professors Julia Reinhard Lupton (UC Irvine), James Kearney (UC Santa Barbara), and Lowell Gallagher (UCLA), is sponsored by CMRS. Speakers will include Professors Allison Deutermann (Baruch College, CUNY), Aranye Fradenburg (UC Santa Barbara), David Glimp (University of Colorado, Boulder), Laurie Shannon (Northwestern University), W.B. Worthen (Columbia University), and Julian Yates (University of Delaware).

  • Place: Royce 314
  • Time: See complete program >>
  • Advance registration not required. No fee. Limited seating.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 


 

CMRS Co-Sponsored Event
Thirteenth Annual Romeo and Juliet Italian Renaissance Ball
Saturday, February 14, 2015

Learn classic fifteenth- and sixteenth-century dances from Renaissance Italy under the Italian Romanesque dome of the Powell Library. All UCLA students, faculty, and staff as well as the general public are welcome; no dance experience is necessary, and there will be instruction throughout the evening. Attire can be costume, formal or semi-formal.

  • Place: Powell Library Rotunda
  • Time: 7:00 PM to 11:00 PM
  • Admission is free but space is limited and reservations are required. To make a reservation for this vintage dance workshop, click here, or call Catherine Brown at 310.206.4608 with the name and the number in people in the party.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 


 

CMRS Lecture
“Magna Carta: New Perspectives and New Discoveries”
Monday, February 23, 2015

Professor Emeritus David Carpenter (Medieval History, King’s College London) is a leading authority on the history of Britain in the central middle ages and has written widely on English social, economic, architectural, military and political history in the 13th century. He is particularly involved in finding the copies made of the 1215 charter in the rest of the 13th century. Many of these, he has discovered, turn out not to be copies of the final charter at all, but instead preserve rival versions of clauses proposed but ultimately rejected during the negotiations at Runnymede. This finding casts altogether new light both on those negotiations and on what the political community knew about Magna Carta in the 13th century. Co-sponsored by UCLA Executive Vice Chancellor & Provost Scott L. Waugh.

  • Place: Royce 314
  • Time: 4:30 PM
  • Advance registration not required. No fee. Limited seating.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 


 

CMRS Roundtable
“The 500th-Anniversary of Francis I’s Reign (1515-1547)”
Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Francis I has been called the first French Renaissance King. His own poems present a powerful image of his many facets as a knightly king and as a patron of the arts and letters, actively shaping France’s political and cultural identity. Professor Cynthia Skenazi (French and Italian, UC Santa Barbara) reexamines Francis I on the 500th anniversary of the beginning of his reign.

  • Place: Royce 306
  • Time: 12:00 PM
  • Advance registration not required. No fee. Limited seating.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 


 

CMRS Conference
“The Illustrated Body: Printing, Anatomy, and Art in the Renaissance”
Friday-Saturday, February 27-28, 2015

This international conference – jointly organized by CMRS, UCLA Library Special Collections, and UCLA Biomedical Library History and Special Collections for the Sciences – commemorates the 500th anniversary of the birth of Andreas Vesalius (1514 -1564), the Flemish founder of modern anatomy and the author of De humani corporis fabrica, one of the most circulated books on the subject during the early modern period, and the 500th anniversary of the death of Aldus Manutius, the founder of the Aldine Press in Venice.

UCLA Library Special Collections in the Charles E. Young Research Library (YRL) houses one of the world’s most important collections of books produced by the Aldine Press. UCLA’s Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library History includes a number of early printings of Vesalius’s ground-breaking anatomical illustrations. An exhibit of rare books from these collections, curated by Jane Carpenter (YRL) and Russell Johnson (UCLA Biomedical Library) will be on display in YRL in conjunction with the conference.

  • Place: Room 11360, Charles E. Young Research Library
  • Time: See complete program >>
  • Advance registration not required. No fee. Limited seating.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 


 

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