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CMRS Roundtable
“The Landscape Archaeology of Judicial Culture in Anglo-Saxon England”
Wednesday, April 1, 2015

This presentation by Professor Andrew Reynolds (University College London Institute of Archaeology) considers the archaeological, written and toponymic evidence for the emergence of judicial practice in Anglo-Saxon England. Close attention to the physical evidence for legal culture in England between the 7th and 11th centuries reveals new understandings of the subject in chronological and landscape terms. Topics of enquiry include relationships between elites and local societies, the notion of dispersed administrative systems as a robust mode of social organisation and the interplay between custom and law in a society which underwent fundamental changes of religion and complexity over a relatively short period of time.

  • Place: Royce 306
  • Time: 12:00 PM
  • Advance registration not required. No fee. Limited seating.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 


CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture
“Subtle Cobwebs, Fitter to Catch Flies Than Souls? The Problem of Angelic Location in Mediaeval Philosophy”
Wednesday, April 8, 2015

The nature and properties of angels provided crucial test cases for medieval physics and metaphysics. CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Professor Christopher Martin (Philosophy, University of Auckland) discusses the development of theories of angelic location and motion in the first half of the fourteenth century in response to the rejection of some earlier accounts in the Parisian condemnations of 1277. He is particularly interested in how questions of angelic location and motion were deployed in attempting to understand the fundamental principles of Aristotelian metaphysics. Having indicated the crucial role of angels for medieval metaphysics, Professor Martin concludes by discussing what seems to be very much the most likely source (found in a fourteenth-century text) for the famous slur against it—that it was excessively concerned with how many of them might dance on the head of a pin.

  • Place: Royce 314
  • Time: 4:00 PM
  • Advance registration not required. No fee. Limited seating.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 


 

CMRS Conference
“Re/Creations: Text and Performance in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe”
Friday-Saturday, April 10-11, 2015

The challenges and innovations that beset European theater from the mid-fifteenth century to the end of the sixteenth century both enriched and imperiled this cultural institution. The renewal of interest in antique forms of theater—tragedies and comedies—accompanied the displacement of passion and saint’s plays, while some of these popular forms were repurposed for political motives. Cross-cultural adaptation and translation flourished; authors increasingly tied their names to texts; productions were steered to elite audiences. Verse plays both humorous and dramatic jostled with the theatrical innovation of commedia dell’arte, which deemphasized written text in favor of set characters and physical improvisation. The social and governmental satires of farce, carnival, and fool’s play often morphed into the Wars of Religion waged onstage, in turn leading to the suppression of authors and performances.

This conference, organized by Dr. Sharon King (CMRS Associate) and Professor Massimo Ciavolella (UCLA), addresses some of the myriad ways theatre was reinvented, restyled, reimagined, and reproduced in communities on the continent and in England during the later Middle Ages and early modern periods. It also explores how these plays are received and perceived today. In conjunction with the conference, the acting troupe Les Enfans Sans Abri performs the anonymous farce The Gallant Who Got Away With It and Marguerite de Navarre’s Stricken.

 


CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar
“‘The Vision of Him Found in Woman’: The Castilian Virgin and Iberian Islam”
Tuesday, April 14, 2015

CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Cynthia Robinson (Professor of Art History and Near Eastern Studies, Cornell University) explores the concept of the feminine [quasi-]divine in Nasrid devotional culture and posits that this phenomenon came into existence in dialogue--not always amicable--with the particularly Castilian incarnation of the Virgin, the result, at least in part, of long centuries of contact with medieval Iberia's Muslim and Jewish communities.

  • Place: Royce 314
  • Time: 4:00 PM
  • Advance registration not required. No fee. Limited seating.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 


 

CMRS Roundtable
“A Capital Project: Paris and the Compagnie de la Terre Ferme de l’Amérique, ou France Equinoctialle”
Wednesday, April 15, 2015

In 1651 a group of Parisian investors created the “Compagnie de la Terre ferme de l’Amérique,” a joint-stock company whose goal was to establish a colony in French Guiana, on the coast of South America. Through the lens of the rise and collapse of the Compagnie de l’Amérique, this paper explores the role of Paris as the capital of the “colonial machine” in seventeenth century France. CMRS Associate Professor Gayle Brunelle (Cal State Fullerton) argues that France’s Paris-based “colonial machine” was highly dysfunctional at least until the era of Colbert due both the lack of institutional structures to construct and manage overseas commercial companies and colonies, and due to the types of people who invested in and directed these companies. This structural “mismatch” goes a long way toward explaining why France struggled to establish viable, let alone profitable, overseas colonies outside the sugar plantations of the West Indies in the seventeenth century.

  • Place: Royce 306
  • Time: 12:00 PM
  • Advance registration not required. No fee. Limited seating.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 


 

CMRS Co-sponsored Conference
“Visual and Textual Dialogues in Colonial Mexico and Europe: The Florentine Codex”
Friday-Saturday, April 17-18, 2015

Organized by the Center for 17th- and 18th-Century Studies -- contact them for more information.

 


 

CMRS Co-sponsored Lecture
“Polemical Encounters: Martin de Figuerola and his Work with the Moors of Aragon”
Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Mercedes Garcia Arenal (CSIC, Madrid) focuses on the religious history of Iberia and the Muslim West, mainly on religious minorities: conversion, polemics, messianism, religious dissidence, and dissimulation. She has focused on the impulses of assimilation and rejection by mainstream societies of religious minorities such as Muslims and converted Muslims in Iberia and Jews in North Africa. Much of her research is based on Inquisition documentation. There will be commentary by Claire Gilbert (History, St. Louis University).

This lecture is sponsored by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the Department of History, the Department of Spanish & Portuguese, the Center for 17th- and 18th-Century Studies, and the LAMAR Consortium.

  • Place: Royce 306
  • Time: 5:00 PM
  • Advance registration not required. No fee. Limited seating.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 


 

CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture
“Poetry Across Languages: In and Out of Latin with Marvell and Milton ”
Monday, April 27, 2015

John Milton’s double book of 1645, containing a vernacular volume of English poems (plus a handful in Italian) followed by a volume of Latin poemata (plus a couple in Greek), announces and codifies one of the preeminent early modern poetic careers across languages. Milton's Latinity is always good to think with, in whatever language he is writing. On a smaller scale, the oeuvre of Milton’s contemporary Andrew Marvell includes a number of Latin and English poems composed in cross-referential pairs. A reading of Marvell’s Hortus alongside his famous Garden, or of Ros alongside Drop of Dew, rather than getting bogged down in questions of priority between the two versions, can find an active sense of mutuality between them, and a point of access to some broader questions about poetic bilingualism, as discussed by CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Stephen Hinds (Professor of Classics, Byron W. and Alice L. Lockwood Professor of the Humanities University of Washington, Seattle) discusses in this lecture.

  • Place: Royce 314
  • Time: 4:00 PM
  • Advance registration not required. No fee. Limited seating.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 


 

Division of Humanities Workshop
“Knowledge without Frontiers: Medieval and Renaissance Medical Traditions in UCLA Collections”
Monday, April 27, 2015

The Division of Humanities is pleased to present a workshop by Dr. Alain Touwaide (Institute for the Preservation of Medical Traditions) on “Knowledge without Frontiers: Medieval and Renaissance Medical Traditions in UCLA Collections”. Greek, Latin, Armenian, Persian, and Arabic medical manuscripts from UCLA Collections will bring to light the connections between different communities around the Mediterranean and illustrate early forms of global health awareness.

  • Place: Royce 306
  • Time: 12:00 PM
  • Advance registration not required. No fee. Limited seating.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 


 

Dean's Lecture
"The Healing Herbs of Antiquity: Dioscorides' 'De materia medica'"
Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Alain Touwaide is an historian of medicine and science who researches medical traditions, especially therapeutics, from the ancient world to the present day. His institute fosters border-crossing research and education in the medical humanities. The lecture starts from the observation that the medicinal plants and diet of ancient Greece are more than ever on the agenda of contemporary medicine. Dr Touwaide explores sources for the discovery of the therapeutic and dietetic legacy of ancient Greece and asks "what do we actually know about the healing herbs of antiquity?"

Please RSVP to Yarell Castellanos by April 21: ycastellanos@support.ucla. edu

 


 

CMRS Roundtable
“Marco Polo and the World Empire of Letters”
Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Marco Polo and Ristichello of Pisa's Description of the World is typically considered alongside other narratives of first contact, like those of John of Plano Carpini and William of Rubruck. Professor Sharon Kinoshita (Literature, UC Santa Cruz, and CMRS Associate) asks how our conception of the text might change if we situated it instead in the company of contemporary French and Franco-Italian prose texts, on the one hand, and Asian geographical and travel narratives, on the other.

  • Place: Royce 306
  • Time: 12:00 PM
  • Advance registration not required. No fee. Limited seating.
  • Self-service parking is in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5. More information and maps at the UCLA Parking website.

 


 

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