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Spring 2014 Graduate Courses

Click a letter for the Department's course listings:

A | C | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | R | S | T

A

Arabic

ARABIC 220. SEMINAR: ISLAMIC TEXTS
SEM 1
Instructor: SAYEED, A.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Major Islamic thinkers and their works from classical period to modern times. Coverage of doctrines and hermeneutics of various schools of thought in Islam, such as Ahl al-sunna wa'l-jama'a, Shi'a, Mu'tazila, and Sufis. May be organized around one author and his works, multiple authors and their works, or specific topic with representative readings from various schools. Exploration of secondary literature in Arabic and other languages for student research papers. Units: 4.0

ARABIC 240A. SEMINAR: ARAB HISTORIANS
SEM 1
Instructor: POONAWALA, I.K.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Introduction to very large body of literature on medieval Islamic history. Selected readings in Arabic that represent cross-section of Islamic historical writings, including Ibn Ishaq's "Sira," Waqidi's "Maghazi," Baladhuri's "Futuh," Tabari's "Ta'rikh," digests of Ya'qubi and Mas'udi, Ibn Khaldun's "Muqaddima," and Maqrizi's topography. Historians studied either to determine their reliability as sources or their view of history and its theoretical foundations. Exploration of sources, research tools, and problems in Islamic history. Units: 4.0

Architecture and Urban Design

ARCH&UD 290. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CRITICAL STUDIES IN ARCHITECTURAL CULTURE
LEC 1
Instructor: FAVRO, D.G.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 11 hours. Designed for graduate students. Exploration of how architecture operates in relation to wider cultural, historical, and theoretical issues. Units: 5.0

Armenian

ARMENIA 230C. ELEMENTARY CLASSICAL ARMENIAN
LEC 1
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 230B. Introduction to grammar of classical literary language (5th to mid-19th century) and guided readings in narrative prose texts. Units: 4.0

ARMENIA 232C. ADVANCED CLASSICAL ARMENIAN
LEC 1
Instructor: COWE, P.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 231A or 231B or 231C. In-depth reading and linguistic analysis of texts related to Philhellene School of 6th to 8th century and related works up to 19th century. Units: 4.0

Art History

ART HIS 225. MEDIEVAL ART
SEM 1
Instructor: COHEN, M.M.
Course Description: Seminar, two hours. Studies in selected topics in Byzantine and European medieval art. Units: 4.0

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C

Celtic Studies

Not scheduled tis quarter.

Chinese

CHIN 265B. SEMINAR: CHINESE BUDDHIST TEXTS
SEM 1
Instructor: HELLER, N.L.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Units: 4.0

Classics

Not scheduled this quarter.

Comparative Literature

Not scheduled this quarter.

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E

Economics

Not scheduled this quarter.

English

ENGL 244. OLD AND MEDIEVAL ENGLISH LITERATURE
LEC 1
Instructor: CHISM, C.N.
Class Title: Before European Hegemony: theorizing premodern cultural encounter
Course Description: Lecture, four hours. This course explores the roots of modern orientalisms in the medieval period’s rich literary history of cultural conflict and exchange, focusing on the interrelationships of four great traditions: classical antiquity, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and using texts in Middle English and translations from French, Latin, Spanish Arabic, and Hebrew. We will begin with crusade discourses, evidenced in eyewitness accounts, interreligious polemic, and romance. Then we will explore travel narratives, descriptions of the world, and gender-centralizing tales of transcultural marriage, conversion, and chivalric service. By surveying this range of genres and literary traditions, the class aims not only to explore an important area of premodern literature and culture but also to assess how useful and adaptable are the historically situated theories of Gayatri Spivak, Edward Said, Arjun Appadurai, and other theorists of power and alterity to a pre-modern period of complex global circulations. How can postcolonial paradigms be put into a constructive dialogue with medieval theories of cultural authority and alterity? If modern postcolonial studies investigate, in the words of Homi K. Bhabha "the nation-space in the process of the articulation of elements," how must those investigations change for a period before European hegemony, and how can the complexities of premodern global circulations inform our own shifting globalisms? The reading for this class may include readings by Abu Lughod, Said, Spivak, and Bhabha, Kinoshita, Akbari, Menocal, Stoler and McGranahan. Some of the primary texts will in Middle English and may include: The Wonders of the East, The Song of Roland, El Cid, The Sultan of Babylon, Alexander and Dindimus, Marco Polo, The Travels of John Mandeville, Chaucer's Squire's Tale and Man of Law’s Tale, Anna Comnena's Alexiad, the travel narratives of Ibn Battuta and Ibn Jubayr, the survey of Benjamin of Tudela, and Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities. There will be two conference-length papers, (or an optional first draft and long seminar paper – your choice), weekly response papers, and a class presentation. Units: 4.0

ENGL 246. RENAISSANCE LITERATURE
LEC 1
Instructor: SHUGER, D.K.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours. The course is intended to provide an introduction to Reformation theology (Protestant and Catholic), the history of the English Reformation, and a host of splendid and little-known works of Tudor religious prose and poetry, including Spenser’s Ruins of time, Ann Lock's paraphrase of psalm 51 (the first English sonnet sequence), Philip and Mary Sidney's psalter, Southwell and Alabaster (both major Catholic poets), and the greatest prose writer and thinker of the sixteenth century, Richard Hooker. Since the standard Protestant authors taught in the schools were Continental rather than English, we’ll also take a look at some of their work (e.g., the Commonplaces of Melanchthon). We'll also look at pre-Reformation and Marian writings, devotional texts, sacramental theology, godly marriage manuals, providential history, and predestination. Almost all the readings will be provided in a massive course pack (perhaps available at the book store, perhaps on Dropbox), all with modern spelling and punctuation, although we will also explore the amazing internet resources of PRDL, EEBO, and the Bavarian State Library. There will be no seminar paper. Instead, participants will write up a couple of pages of comments and questions for each week's readings, do some editing and glossing of the texts, and, in the end, draw up a prospectus for a research paper. (I will be happy to work with anyone who wishes to then write the research paper over the summer.) The seminar will also have an optional Neo-Latin add-on (a one-credit group independent study), where we will read portions of Cardinal Bellarmine's massive, late 16th c Disputationes de controversiis Christianae fidei adversus hujus temporis haereticos, which (to quote Wikipedia): "was the earliest attempt to systematize the various controversies of the time, and made an immense impression throughout Europe, the strength of its arguments against Protestantism so acutely felt in Germany and England that special chairs were founded in order to provide replies to it. Thomas Hobbes, Theodore Beza and John Rainolds were among those who wrote counter-arguments against the work. The first volume treats of the Word of God, of Christ, and of the pope; the second of the authority of ecumenical councils, and of the Church, whether militant, suffering, or triumphant; the third of the sacraments; and the fourth of Divine grace, free will, justification, and good works." The Latin is straightforward, and I have drawn up a 34 (!) page list of the chapter headings, which participants in the add-on can use to find the topics that interest them: that is, the readings chosen will be those selected by the group. Note: you do not have to take the seminar to join the Bellarmine reading group. Units: 4.0

ENGL 257. STUDIES IN POETRY
LEC 1
Instructor: YENSER, S.I.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Studies in various themes and forms of poetry from Old English to present; limits of investigation set by individual instructor. Units: 4.0

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F

French

FRNCH 207. STUDIES IN HISTORY OF IDEAS
SEM 1
Instructor: MELZER, S.E.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Particular problems in French literature and ideas. Units: 4.0

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G

Gender Studies

Not scheduled this quarter.

German

Not scheduled this quarter.

Greek

Not scheduled this quarter.

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H

Hebrew

HEBREW 230. RABBINIC HEBREW LITERATURE
SEM 1
Instructor: BAKHOS, C.A.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Units: 4.0

History

HIST 201R. TOPICS IN HISTORY: JEWISH HISTORY
SEM 1
Class Title: Why History? Mission of the Historian
Instructor: MYERS, D.N.
Class Description: Many today ask what value of studying history is in a world that requires immediately applicable technical skills for rapidly changing 21st-century economy. Do we need to possess firm knowledge of the past? Exploration of varying rationales for study of history, as seen through eyes and words of the historian. Study draws from variety of fields of inquiry, including Jewish history and European history. Investigation of ways in which history is seen not only as source of knowledge, but as indispensable repository of group memory, consolation, and moral judgment. Units: 4.0

HIST 213B. HISTORY OF WOMEN, MEN, SEXUALITY
SEM 1
Instructor: DUBOIS, E.C.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 213A. Research, analysis, drafting, and rewriting of student final papers. Units: 4.0

HIST 221A. SEMINAR: MEDIEVAL HISTORY
SEM 1
Instructor: GOLDBERG, J.L.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Course 221A is requisite to 221B. Units: 4.0

HIST 297B. SEMINAR: HISTORY OF SCIENCE
SEM 1
Instructor: WISE, M.N.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Units: 4.0

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I

Indo-European Studies

Not scheduled this quarter.

Iranian

IRANIAN 220B. CLASSICAL PERSIAN TEXTS
LEC 1
Instructor: SHAYEGAN, M.R.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 103A, 103B, 103C. Study of selected classical Persian texts. Units: 4.0

Islamic Studies

Not scheduled this quarter.

Italian

ITALIAN 225. CULTURAL HISTORY OF ITALIAN LANGUAGE
LEC 1
Instructor: TUTTLE, E.F.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Historical survey of development of Italian language from medieval times to unification of country in 1861. "Questione della lingua," general acceptance of Florentine speech, and its evolution into national language. Units: 4.0

ITALIAN 298. VARIABLE TOPICS IN ITALIAN STUDIES
LEC 1
Class Title: Great Storytellers from Boccaccio to Calvino
Instructor: THE STAFF
Class Description: Discussion of genre of the short story and other short narrative forms in Italian tradition from 13th to 20th century, starting with the Novellino and Boccaccio, and going on to works by Bandello, Giraldi Cinzio, Da Porto, Leopardi (Le Operette morali), Verga, Pirandello, Fenoglio, Caproni, and Calvino. Units: 4.0

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J

Japanese

Not scheduled this quarter.

Jewish Studies

Not scheduled this quarter.

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K

Korean

Not scheduled this quarter.

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L

Latin

Not scheduled this quarter.

Law

Not scheduled this quarter.

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M

Musicology

Not scheduled this quarter.

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N

Near Eastern Languages

Not scheduled this quarter.

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P

Philosophy

PHILOS 207. SEMINAR: HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE PHILOSOPHY
SEM 1
Instructor: THE STAFF
Course Description: Seminar, four hours. Selected problems and philosophers. Units: 4.0

Political Science

Not scheduled this quarter.

Portuguese

Not scheduled this quarter.

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R

Romance Linguistics

Not scheduled this quarter.

Russian

RUSSIAN 211A. LITERATURE OF MEDIEVAL RUS'
LEC 1
Instructor: LENHOFF, G.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Required for M.A. (literature). Survey of the literature from its beginning through the Kievan and Muscovite periods up to end of the 17th century. Units: 4.0

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S

Scandinavian

Not scheduled this quarter.

Semitics

Not scheduled this quarter.

Slavic Languages and Literature

Not scheduled this quarter.

Spanish

SPAN 223. MEDIEVAL PROSE
LEC 1
Instructor: DAGENAIS, J.C.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Readings of and lectures on Spanish prose from the beginning to 1500. Units: 4.0

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T

Theater

THEATER 246C. HISTORY OF COSTUME
LEC 1
Instructor: GIRARD, P.E.
Course Description: Lecture/studio, four hours. Designed for graduate students. Study of history of costume as manifestation of cultural, social, economic, and political influences to provide historical framework for design of costumes for theater, film, and television. Historic survey and in-depth exploration of selected periods, with study of influences of diverse cultures. Units: 4.0

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