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Religious Diversity in the Medieval Mediterranean, Part 1: Inter-Communal Disputation and Discussion
AHA Session 180 - Medieval Academy of America 3
Saturday, January 4, 2014: 11:30 AM-1:30 PM
Columbia Hall 1 (Washington Hilton)
Chair: Brian A. Catlos, University of Colorado Boulder
Papers:
• Mudejar Religious Polemics in Late Medieval Iberia: Kitāb al-Muǧādala maʿa -l-Yahūd wa’l-Naṣārā, or The Book of the Disputation with the Jews and the Christians • Mònica Colominas Aparicio, University of Amsterdam
• Mistrusting the Bible: Ibn Taymiyya’s (d. 1328) Views of Biblical Distortion and Altercation (Tahrif) • Younus Mirza, Millsaps College
• Conflict and Convivencia in Eleventh- to Thirteenth-Century Anatolia • Sergio La Porta, California State University, Fresno
• Crossing Religious Boundaries in the Early Medieval Mediterranean: The Case of Southern Italy and Sicily • Valerie Ramseyer, Wellesley College
Comment: Alex J. Novikoff, Fordham University

Session Abstract: The first panel of the “Religious Diversity in the Medieval Mediterranean” workshop looks at inter-communal disputation, polemic, and various manifestations of ethno-religious boundaries. The four panelists include graduate students and senior faculty from North America and Europe. Collectively, they examine the theme of inter-communal dispute from Iberia to Anatolia. The first two papers show how religious boundaries were created and maintained. Mònica Colominas Aparicio analyses a fourteenth-century anti-Christian and anti-Jewish polemic, written by a mudejar who was strongly influenced by contemporary Latin and Aristotelian traditions. Younus Mirza locates the attitude of the great theologian Ibn Taymiyya to the Christian Bible by triangulating him with Ibn Hazm and al-Ghazali, two other towering Islamic thinkers. The second two papers show how tenuous and geographically contextual inter-communal boundaries between Muslims and Christians could be: in Anatolia in the case of Sergio La Porta, and in Sicily and Southern Italy in the case of Valerie Ramseyer. Together, these four original papers bring out the paradoxes of religious identity in the plural Mediterranean, as seen in both mediation and opposition.

Religious Diversity in the Medieval Mediterranean, Part 2: Intra-communal Disputation and Discussion
AHA Session 207 - Medieval Academy of America 4
Saturday, January 4, 2014: 2:30 PM-4:30 PM
Columbia Hall 1 (Washington Hilton)

Chair: Alex J. Novikoff, Fordham University
Papers:
• Jihād between Muslims at the Time of the Reconquista • Abigail Krasner Balbale, Bard Graduate Center
• Debating Philosophy in the Medieval Jewish Community of Montpellier • Tamar Ron Marvin, Jewish Theological Seminary, Graduate School
• Jewish Doctors according to Three Major Medieval Arabic Literary Sources • Raha Rafii, University of Pennsylvania
• The Trouble with Origins: Christians, Jews, and Converts in the Hagiography of a Sixteenth-Century Moroccan Saint • Manuela Ceballos, Emory University
Comment: Brian A. Catlos, University of Colorado Boulder

Session Abstract: The second panel in the “Religious Diversity in the Medieval Mediterranean” workshop looks at intra-communal disputation and polemics as they fractured or complicated what are often taken to be discrete and monolithic religious affiliations. Tamar Marvin takes a fresh look at the Maimonidean controversy that fractured western Judaism through the lens of communities in fourteenth-century southwest France. Abigail Krasner Balbale shows how Muslims in fragmented post-caliphal al-Andalus could deploy the language of holy war against their own and even as a rationalization for collaboration with Christians. Raha Rafii turns to the ubiquitous but problematic figure of the Jewish physician in the Islamic world, and shows how different authorities dealt with the problem of Jewish practitioners in different ways, and what that reveals about their controversial position. Finally, Manuela Ceballos disentangles the complex currents of identity that were manifested by late medieval converts of Islam – a common phenomenon in the hyper-connected Mediterranean. Identity in this world of religious boundaries and certainties is revealed through these papers to be fluid and variegated. It is a panel that features four young women scholars from leading North American PhD programs, each engaging with the negotiation of ethno-religious identity from original perspectives, and each complicating our notions of religious affiliation in the Middle Ages.

Call for Applications: “The Early Modern Global Caribbean”
A Residential Seminar at the Huntington Library, San Marino, CA

Monday 30 June –Friday 18 July 2014

Applications are invited for participation in the inaugural seminar of The Clark-Huntington-USC EMSI Summer Institute for the Study of Early Modernity, which will meet at the Huntington Library from 30 June to 18 July 2014, to consider the essential but understudied early modern global Caribbean. During an era that witnessed an increasingly interconnected world, in which Europeans sought trade and dominion in distant lands, the Caribbean occupied a key situation. The location of Columbus’ landfall and the first place that the natives of the Americas felt the full force of European dominance, the West Indies became from the middle of the sixteenth century a locus of contestation among European, American, and African peoples. Initially the Spanish monarchy defined the Greater Caribbean as an exclusively Iberian Sea. Despite such prohibitions on their presence, various Europeans infiltrated the sea first as occasional visitors, trading illegally, raiding and harvesting natural resources such as salt, logwood, and turtle. From the early seventeenth century the English, French, and Dutch established settlements of their own, against Spanish proscriptions and despite occasional military incursions aimed at clearing out intruders. Over the next century, the West Indies functioned as a watery borderland. Encounters, peaceful coexistence, frequent violent clashes, oppression, collusion, and betrayal shaped this space, as various peoples carved out lives and livelihoods for themselves.

This seminar will consist of three three-hour a.m. meetings in each of the three weeks beginning Monday 30 June, to a total of twenty-seven hours contact time. The sessions will consider the evidentiary base and conceptual frameworks for the study of the early modern global Caribbean during this formative period. Scholars, including advanced graduate students and faculty at any level, working on an aspect of the Greater Caribbean (from any relevant discipline and researching in any language) prior to the turn of the eighteenth century, are invited to participate.

Those selected will receive a stipend of $3000, but will be expected to use that sum to meet their living costs (including accommodation) and to cover their transportation to and from the Huntington. Participation for the full three weeks is mandatory. Outside the formal sessions of the seminar, participants will be welcome to use the collections in the Library’s reading rooms during their regular opening hours.

Seminar convener Carla Gardina Pestana, Professor of History and Joyce Appleby Chair of America in the World, is the author of a number of works on early American and Atlantic history. She is currently writing a book on the English conquest of Jamaica. In 2010 she co-convened (with David Shields) a seminar on the Early English Caribbean at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C.

There is no application form. An application consists of:
1. Cover sheet with the following information: Name; mailing address; email address; telephone number; present rank and institution name; date PhD received or expected; citizenship status.
2. A two-page statement of research interests which explains why they are cognate with the themes of the seminar.
3. A current CV of no more than three pages.
4. Two letters of recommendation sent directly to the selection committee. It is the applicant's responsibility to contact referees who will write on their behalf. Please do not send letters from your job dossier.

Please do not submit any materials in excess of the items listed above.

Submission Guidelines
1. The APPLICATION must be submitted as a single document in PDF file format only to fellowships@huntington.org. Please reference “Caribbean Seminar” in SUBJECT line.
2. LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION—in PDF file format only—must be submitted directly from the recommender to letters@huntington.org. The applicant’s name should be referenced in the SUBJECT line. Letters should be no more than three pages in length.

APPLICATIONS AND LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION MUST BE RECEIVED BY NO LATER THAN FEBRUARY 7, 2014.

Please direct questions about the application process to Dr. Steve Hindle, W.M. Keck Foundation Director of Research at the Huntington Library, at shindle@huntington.org. (Do not send applications or letters to this email address.)

Dr. Mary Robertson has recently retired after many years of distinguished service as the William A. Moffett Curator of English Historical Manuscripts at the Huntington Library. The Research Division of the Huntington is delighted to announce a two-day program of talks in Mary’s honor, celebrating her achievement in encouraging and facilitating so much high quality research and scholarship in British history among several generations of graduate students and faculty.

Mary’s lifelong enthusiasm for all things Tudor has been evident to all of us, so it is a pleasure to announce a symposium of papers in the history of sixteenth-century England to take place on the afternoon of Friday 14 February 2014. The program will begin at 1:30 pm in the Ahmanson Classroom of the Brody Botanical Center at the Huntington. Coffee and tea will be available from 1:00 pm and the program will conclude with a drinks reception.

The speakers will be:
Dr. Steven Gunn (Merton College, Oxford): “Work, Leisure, and Accidental Death in Tudor England”
Dr. Neil Younger (University of Essex): “The Confessional State and the Political Nation in Elizabethan England”

We would be delighted if you and your colleagues, friends, and graduate students are able to attend. You do not need to RSVP in order to attend this program.

Please note that the regular meeting of the Early Modern British History Seminar will take place the following morning, Saturday 15 February. The speaker will be Dr. Alison Wiggins of the University of Glasgow, who will be speaking on the Bess of Hardwick online letters project.

We hope to see you on February 14th.

The Medieval Academy of America
Annual Meeting, UCLA, Los Angeles, 2014

The 2014 Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy of America will be held jointly with the Medieval Association of the Pacific on 10-12 April 2014 in Los Angeles at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and hosted by the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

    SESSIONS
  1. Encountering Byzantium: The Empire through the Gaze of Others
  2. Byzantine Art as a Site of Encounter
  3. Architecture and Encounter
  4. On Teaching the Middle Ages to K-12 [two sessions]
  5. Travel and Pilgrimage Literature
  6. The Postcolonial Encounter in Medieval English Literature
  7. The Traffic in Religions
  8. Encounters between Cultures: Conflicts and Conflict Resolution
  9. Medicine and Literature
  10. Shipwrecks and Shipping
  11. What's New in Medieval Studies?
  12. Empires of Fantasy
  13. Encountering the Past and the Page in Medieval English Literature
  14. Digital Humanities
  15. Museums and the Presentation of the Middle Ages
  16. Medievalism: The Middle Ages in Film and Video Games
  17. Cartography: Visual Representation of Encounters
  18. Preconceptions of the World outside Europe
  19. Medieval Culture of Empire Language Communities
  20. Frederick II and the Islamic World
  21. Sites of Encounter: Armenia
  22. Sites of Encounter: Norman Sicily
  23. Sites of Encounter: North Africa
  24. Sites of Encounter: Iberia
  25. Scandinavians and Empire
  26. Charlemagne
  27. Queens, Empresses, and Women of Power
  28. Diversity of Religious Communities in the Medieval West
  29. Gifts and Exchange
  30. Travel to Different Worlds
  31. Ritual Encounters: Festivals, Processions, Parades and Triumphs
  32. Exploration
  33. Identifying Cultural Encounters and Networks from Archaeological Evidence
  34. German Manuscripts and Imperial Authority: Routes of Transmission
  35. Manuscript Illumination
  36. Rome's Revival: Encounters with Rome in the Middle Ages
  37. Crusade Encounters
  38. Sites of Encounter in Medieval Literature

Register at http://medievalacademy.site-ym.com/events/event_details.asp?id=369210

The Consolidated Medieval Research Group “Space, Power and Culture” of Lleida University is currently organising the fourth International Medieval Meeting Lleida, which will be held at Lleida’s Facultat de Lletres on 25, 26, 27 June 2014. Like the last IMMLleida, this event will featurefour different conferences, each of them focusing on a different aspect of "POTESTAS" and different papers on a different aspects of medieval studies (i.e. history, art history, archaeology, philology and literature).
Furthermore, there will be sessions about research management, as well as sessions introducing the activities of research institutions,
presentations by companies dedicated to the management and promotion of heritage, and other activities related to the Middle Ages.

Anyone interested in any aspect of Medieval History is welcome to participate in the IMMLleida! We would like to encourage you to present a paper or organise a session or, if applicable, introduce your research group, your publications, or simply come along to enjoy the conference and take part in the free cultural events we have organised for those summer nights.

To enrol, simply fill in the relevant form on our website: www.internationalmedievalmeetinglleida.udl.cat If you have any queries at all, please contact us: immlleida@historia.udl.cat

“The Global Early Modern Caribbean”
A Residential Seminar at the Huntington Library, San Marino, CA

Monday 30 June –Friday 18 July 2014

The Huntington Library, UCLA, and the USC Early Modern Studies Institute (EMSI) will run a pilot in the summer of 2014 for a West Coast equivalent to the Folger Institute and the Center for Renaissance Studies Program at the Newberry Library. This will be a collaborative project involving the Huntington, UCLA's Clark Library, USC EMSI, and other universities in the area, and will be formally entitled the Huntington-Clark Summer Institute in Early Modern Studies.

We envisage that our Summer Institute will place a particular emphasis on early modernity in its broadest spatial context; that is to say, it will cover the British and European territory on which the Folger and the Newberry libraries also focus, but will go beyond it to embrace our very considerable faculty strengths in other areas, especially the Americas.

The pilot Institute next summer will be held at the Huntington Library between Monday 30 June and Friday 18 July, and will have space for approximately twelve faculty and graduate student participants. We have agreed that we should launch with a UCLA faculty member at the helm and are delighted that Professor Carla Pestana has agreed to teach the Institute seminar on “The Global Early Modern Caribbean.”

During an era that witnessed an increasingly interconnected world, in which Europeans sought trade and dominion in distant lands, the Caribbean occupied a key situation. The location of Columbus’ landfall and the first place that the natives of the Americas felt the full force of European dominance, the West Indies became from the middle of the sixteenth century a locus of contestation among European, American, and African peoples. Initially the Spanish monarchy defined the Greater Caribbean as an exclusively Iberian Sea. Despite such prohibitions on their presence, various Europeans infiltrated the sea first as occasional visitors, trading illegally, raiding and harvesting natural resources such as salt, logwood, and turtle. From the early seventeenth century the English, French, and Dutch established settlements of their own, against Spanish proscriptions and despite occasional military incursions aimed at clearing out intruders. Over the next century, the West Indies functioned as a watery borderland. Encounters, peaceful coexistence, frequent violent clashes, oppression, collusion, and betrayal shaped this space, as various peoples carved out lives and livelihoods for themselves.

This seminar will consist of three three-hour a.m. meetings in each of the three weeks beginning Monday 30 June, to a total of twenty-seven hours contact time. The sessions will consider the evidentiary base and conceptual frameworks for the study of the early modern global Caribbean during this formative period. Scholars, including advanced graduate students and faculty at any level, working on an aspect of the Greater Caribbean (from any relevant discipline and researching in any language) prior to the turn of the eighteenth century, are invited to participate.

Those selected will receive a stipend of $3000, but will be expected to use that sum to meet their living costs (including accommodation) and to cover their transportation to and from the Huntington. Participation for the full three weeks is mandatory. Outside the formal sessions of the seminar, participants will be welcome to use the collections in the Library’s reading rooms during their regular opening hours.

Seminar convener Carla Gardina Pestana, Professor of History and Joyce Appleby Chair of America in the World at UCLA, is the author of a number of works on early American and Atlantic history. She is currently writing a book on the English conquest of Jamaica. In 2010 she co-convened (with David Shields) a seminar on the Early English Caribbean at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C.
Application Procedure
There is no application form. An application consists of:
1. Cover sheet with the following information: Name; mailing address; email address; telephone number; present rank and institution name; date PhD received or expected; citizenship status.
2. A two-page statement of research interests which explains why they are cognate with the themes of the seminar.
3. A current CV of no more than three pages.
4. Two letters of recommendation sent directly to the selection committee. It is the applicant's responsibility to contact referees who will write on their behalf. Please do not send letters from your job dossier.
Please do not submit any materials in excess of the items listed above.
Submission Guidelines
1. The APPLICATION must be submitted as a single document in PDF file format only to fellowships@huntington.org. Please reference “Caribbean Seminar” in SUBJECT line.
2. LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION—in PDF file format only—must be submitted directly from the recommender to letters@huntington.org. The applicant’s name should be referenced in the SUBJECT line. Letters should be no more than three pages in length.
APPLICATIONS AND LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION MUST BE RECEIVED BY NO LATER THAN FEBRUARY 7, 2014.

Please direct questions about the application process to Dr. Steve Hindle, W.M. Keck Foundation Director of Research at the Huntington Library, at shindle@huntington.org. (Do not send applications or letters to UCLA.)

Encuentros: Sounding Communities: Music and the Three Religions in Medieval Iberia
Room 1113 of the Interdisciplinary Building South (INTS), UC Riverside
February 20-21, 2014

9:00 Coffee and danishes
9:20 Welcome (Walter Clark, UC Riverside)
9:30-10:45 Session 1 (Chair: Alejandro Planchart, UC Santa Barbara)

Rebecca Maloy, Associate Professor, School of Music, University of Colorado at Boulder, “The Verona Orationale as a Witness to Visigothic Liturgy, Chant, and Exegesis”

Carmen Julia Gutiérrez, Profesora Titular de Historia de la Notación Musical y Técnicas Editoriales, Universidad Complutense de Madrid: “The Mozarabic Chant as a Model for the Construction of Cultural Identity”

10:45-11:00 Break
11:00-12:15 Session 2 (Chair: Marisa Galvez, Stanford University)

Manuel Pedro Ferreira, Professor Associado, Dep. de Ciências Musicais, Universidad Nova de Lisboa: “Medieval Iberian Song in its Mediterranean Context: from Andalusian muwashshahat to the Cantigas de Santa Maria”

Benjamin Liu, Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies, UC Riverside: “Social Antagonisms in the Serranillas”

12:15-2:00 Lunch
2:00-3:45 Session 3 (Chair: Benjamin Liu, UC Riverside)

Dwight Reynolds, Professor of Religious Studies, UC Santa Barbara: “Traffic and Trade in Music and Musicians: Conduits of Courtly Culture in Medieval Iberia”

Carl Davila, Associate Professor of History, SUNY Brockport: “The Andalusi Turn: The Nuba in Mediterranean History”

Lourdes Alvarez, Dean, University of New Haven: “Marketing Mysticism: Shushtari from the Medieval Suq to the Sacred Music Festival Circuit”

3:45-4:00 Break
4:00-5:00 Lecture-Demonstration (Chair: Susan Boynton, Columbia University)

Judith Cohen, York University, Toronto: The Sephardic Romancero

For additional; information contact Walter Clark http://music.ucr.edu/people/faculty/clark/ or Susan Boynton slb184@columbia.edu

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