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Winter 2009

Mellon Interdisciplinary Seminar
“Mediterranean Studies: East and West at the Center, 1050-1600”
Monday, January 12, 2009
Professor Leyla Rouhi (Spanish, Williams College) presents “Towards a Re-definition of ‘co-Existence’ in Early Modern Spanish Literature.” Seminar Leaders: Professors Michael Cooperson (Near Eastern Languages & Cultures, UCLA) and Teofilo Ruiz (History; Spanish & Portuguese, UCLA). View pictures >>

CMRS Faculty Roundtable
“The Scent of a Woman”
Wednesday, January 14, 2009

Professor Shane Butler's (Classics, UCLA) paper traces the remarkable -- and hitherto unrecognized -- influence of antiquity's most famous perfume on Greek and Latin writers, discovering surprising analogies between traditions of poetry and those of perfumery. View pictures >>

Mellon Interdisciplinary Seminar
“Mediterranean Studies: East and West at the Center, 1050-1600”
Tuesday, January 20, 2009

Professor Karla Mallette (Italian, Miami University) presents “Lingua Franca in the Mediterranean.” Seminar Leaders: Professors Massimo Ciavolella (Italian, UCLA) and Peter Stacey (History, UCLA). View pictures >>

Mellon Interdisciplinary Seminar
“Mediterranean Studies: East and West at the Center, 1050-1600”
Monday, January 26, 2009
Professor Valerie Ramseyer (History, and Director of Medieval-Renaissance Studies at Wellesley College) presents “Religious Boundaries and Intersections in Medieval Southern Italy.” Seminar Leaders: Professors Massimo Ciavolella (Italian, UCLA) and Peter Stacey (History, UCLA).

CMRS Faculty Roundtable
“Shades of Parody in Icelandic Saga”
Tuesday, January 27, 2009

With Professor Kendra Willson (Scandinavian, UCLA). The issue of parody in Sagas of Icelanders has been much discussed since Helga Kress (1987). It has been proposed variously that certain Sagas of Icelanders are parodies of others, or parodies of the genre as a whole, or satires of the world view and value system represented by the sagas, or that the entire genre is characterized by parody. Contributions to this discussion should aim to be specific about the type of parody or satire to which they are referring. Another issue which must be addressed in approaching parody in sagas is the understanding of the nature of the text in a semi-oral society and in medieval literature. How can one distinguish between a parody of an individual text and of a genre or tradition? What is the difference between parodying a genre and making use of traditional materials with a different tone? View pictures >>

Mellon Interdisciplinary Seminar
“Mediterranean Studies: East and West at the Center, 1050-1600”
Monday, February 2, 2009

Professor E. Natalie Rothman (History/Anthropology, University of Toronto) presents “Trans-imperial Subjects, Mediation, and Articulation in the Early Modern Mediterranean.” Seminar Leaders: Professors Gabriel Piterberg (History, UCLA) and Peter Stacey (History, UCLA). View pictures >>

CMRS Distinguished Visiting Professor Lecture
“Art and Politics at the Habsburg Imperial Court c. 1550 ”
Tuesday, February 3, 2009

From the mid-1540's onward, Charles V and his entourage, and especially his sister Mary of Hungary, paid increasing attention to the visual arts as a means of interpreting recent events and conveying their idea of Empire. The works then produced by artists such as Titian, Leone Leoni, or Vermeyen were directed at the court audience itself, deeply divided over the imperial succession between the supporters of Charles's son, the future Philip II, and those of his brother Ferdinand. In this lecture, CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Professor Miguel Falomir(Curator of Renaissance Paintings, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid) will discuss the visual strategies developed by artists and patrons in order to achieve their goals and the ways these works echoed different sensibilities at the imperial court. View pictures >>

“Savage Words: Invective as a Literary Genre” 
Thursday, February 5 – Saturday, February 7, 2009

Together with the insult and the verbal attack, invective inhabits the most antisocial sphere of language—a sphere one might expect to be ungoverned by any rules or conventions of genre, where scathing ridicule is unleashed with the same heated anarchy that animates its devoted practitioners. And yet, upon closer examination, invective reveals itself to be one of the most tightly regulated of the literary genres, in which genealogies and norms have been strictly codified since the time of Cicero and Sallust. In fact, manuals of rhetoric, meant for students at all levels, formalize its every aspect—even determining, with clinical precision, the kind of shortcomings to be excoriated in one’s colleagues. Notwithstanding the ironclad regulations to which it is subjected, or possibly because of them, invective has enjoyed continuing favor throughout European circles, being always rediscovered, revisited, and rekindled. This conference will bring together an international array of scholars to delineate the rules of the invective genre, showing its evolution and expressive ductility, analyzing that vast corpus of texts, which, over the centuries, individuals of every provenance (civil or ecclesiastic) have discharged in an effort to vilify either the ideas or the character of their colleagues, to demonstrate their superiority in the art of rhetoric, or, perhaps simply to vent their genuine loathing for those same colleagues. Support for this conference is provided by The Ahmanson Foundation, CMRS, the UCLA Departments of French & Francophone Studies and Italian, and the Italian Cultural Institute of Los Angeles. View pictures >>

Mellon Interdisciplinary Seminar
“Mediterranean Studies: East and West at the Center, 1050-1600”
Monday, February 9, 2009

Professor Zdenka Janekovic Roemer (Institute for Historical Studies, Dubrovnik, Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts) presents “Dubrovnik (Ragusa) in the Eastern Mediterranean.” Seminar Leaders: Professors Barisa Krekic (History, UCLA) and Zrinka Stahuljak (French and Francophone Studies, UCLA). View pictures >>

Mellon Interdisciplinary Seminar
“Mediterranean Studies: East and West at the Center, 1050-1600”
Tuesday, February 17, 2009

Professor Geraldine Heng (English, University of Texas-Austin) presents “Sex, Lies, and Paradise: the Assassins, Prester John, and the Fabulation of Civilizational Identities.” Seminar Leader: Matthew Fisher (English, UCLA). View pictures >>

Annual Hammer Foundation Lecture
“Pagans for Christ: Catholic Historiography in Raphael’s Frescoes in the Vatican”
Thursday, February 19, 2009

Among practically ‘emblematic’ works of Western art is Raphael Sanzio’s School of Athens, painted for Pope Julius II’s private library in the Vatican Palace ca. 1510-1512. This ideal vision of ancient pagan thinkers was painted, however, directly across from a similar view of Christian theologians, the so-called Disputation on the Sacrament, executed immediately before the School of Athens. In his talk, Timothy Verdon (Art Historian, Florence, Italy) suggests the historiographic and ecclesiological coefficients of what is thus an apparently calculated juxtaposition, situating the early-modern conceptual program of the frescoes in the context of fourteenth- and fifteenth-century humanist reflection on the dialogic relation between past and present in the Church. Advance registration required. View pictures >>

Mellon Interdisciplinary Seminar
“Mediterranean Studies: East and West at the Center, 1050-1600”
Monday, February 23, 2009

Professor David Wrisley (American University of Beirut) presents “The Lusignan Sack of Alexandria (1365) and Its Counternarratives.” Seminar Leader: Zrinka Stahuljak (French and Francophone Studies, UCLA). View pictures >>

CMRS Faculty Roundtable
“The Four Great Temples: Buddhist Archaeology, Architecture, and Icons of Seventh-Century Japan”
Tuesday, February 24, 2009

A roundtable discussion by Professor Donald McCallum (Art History, UCLA) based on his recent publication which aims at a new interpretation of the development of Buddhism in seventh-century Japan based on a number of important excavations that have been carried out in recent years. Drawing on that data and the relevant textual evidence, the study focuses on the most important temples and icons produced during the initial stages of Buddhism in Japan. Since the four great temples no longer exist in their original forms, much of the project involves complex issues of reconstruction, in some respects paralleling the situation in Europe during the same century. View pictures >>

CMRS Distinguished Visiting Professor Lecture
“More or Less Constrained: Syntax and Meter in the Poetic Edda”
Wednesday, February 25, 2009

The project “Interfaces of metrics, phonology and syntax,” currently underway at the University of Iceland, has the goal to develop a comprehensive analysis of Old Icelandic poetry from different perspectives. At the core of the investigation is a database containing grammatically and metrically parsed poetic texts. The workflow involves the selection of texts, grammatical marking with XML coding, and marking for metrical, phonological, syntactic and literary features. The database makes it possible to analyze the varieties of metrical form more precisely than before, to investigate the interaction between syntax, metrics and poetic diction, and to shed light on the evolution of the Icelandic language and poetic tradition. In this talk, CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Thórhallur Eythórsson (University of Iceland) will focus on the syntactic analysis of the Poetic Edda (the Codex Regius manuscript) in the database, employing the framework of dependency grammar. In particular, he will be paying close attention to the link between word order and meter in selected poems, seeking to distinguish between special syntactic constraints of poetic diction and archaic constructions preserved in the poetry.

“The Book of Royal Degrees and Russian Historical Consciousness”
Thursday, February 26 - Saturday, February 28, 2009

This three-day international conference, organized by Professor Gail Lenhoff(Slavic Languages and Literatures, UCLA), marks the publication of a critical edition of Russia’s first narrative history, The Book of Royal Degrees, produced in the Moscow metropolitan’s scriptorium between 1555-1564, during the reign of Ivan IV “the Terrible.” The edition was made possible by grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research (NCEEER), with additional support provided by CMRS and the UCLA Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. Invited speakers, representing various academic disciplines, will present papers on the book’s treatment of Muscovite history, politics, theology, literary production, artistic subtexts and reception. Other questions to be considered include: 1) religion and governance; 2) preconditions for a “culture of history”; 3) ways in which pre-modern writers of history seek to understand, legitimize and influence the present; 4) the ways in which historical narratives such as The Book of Royal Degreescontribute to the rise of nationalism and the survival of absolute monarchies; and, 5) the uses of historical narratives in the building of a civil, democratic society. The program is cosponsored by CMRS, the Center for European and Eurasian Studies, the UCLA Vice Chancellor for Research, and the UCLA Dean of Humanities. View pictures >>

Mellon Interdisciplinary Seminar
“Mediterranean Studies: East and West at the Center, 1050-1600”
Monday, March 2, 2009
Professor Maria Mavroudi (History, UC Berkeley) presents “The History and Modern Historiography of Divination in the ‘East’ and ‘West’ and the Case of Islamic Divination.” Seminar Leader: Michael Cooperson (Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, UCLA).

A CMRS Ahmanson Conference
“Medieval Sexuality: 2009”
Friday, March 6 and Saturday, March 7, 2009

Considering that the history of sexuality as a more or less coherent intellectual project is only a few decades old, what we have learned about medieval sexuality so far is remarkable. Precisely because the investigations have only just begun, however, whole areas have yet to be explored. To further this exploration, this conference will bring together scholars from various disciplines and nationalities to take stock of what is being done now and to investigate new areas in the history of medieval sexuality. Attention will be focused on two primary issues: First—What is this thing we call “medieval sexuality”? Does it have any medieval coherence, or, despite what scholars claim to have learned from Foucault, is it just modern sexuality in medieval drag? Second—What can be learned by studying points of exchange, the movement of sexual knowledges or representations across various boundaries? How does sexuality figure in the relationship of medieval text and image? What are the tensions and exchanges between sacred and secular sexualities? And how has the 19th-century science of sexuality defined our ways of understanding medieval sexuality? This conference, organized by Professors Zrinka Stahuljak (French & Francophone Studies, UCLA) and James A. Schultz (Germanic Languages, UCLA) is supported by a grant from the Ahmanson Foundation, with additional funding from CMRS, the UCLA Vice Chancellor for Research, the Humanities Division of the UCLA College of Letters and Science, the UCLA Center for the Study of Women, the UCLA Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Studies Program, and the UCLA Departments of Art History, Comparative Literature, English, French & Francophone Studies, Germanic Languages, and History. View pictures >>

E.A. Moody Medieval Philosophy Workshop
"The Logic of Peter of Spain" 
Saturday, March 7, and Sunday March 8, 2009
The topic for this year’s Moody Medieval Philosophy Workshop will be one of the great best sellers of the Middle Ages: the summaries of logic written by Peter of Spain around 1240. Six talks about Peter’s very influential book will be presented and discussed in the workshop which begins at 10:30 am on Saturday, March 7, in Dodd 399. Speakers will include (not in this order, schedule will be distributed at the workshop):
Brian Copenhaver (UCLA), "Issues in Translating Peter of Spain's Tractatus"
Gyula Klima (Fordham), "Nominalism as the Adverbialization of Semantics: The Case of Buridan vs. Peter of Spain"
Michael Koss (Indiana), "A Comparison of 13th Century Theories of Supposition"
Henrik Lagerlund (U.W.O.), "Peter of Spain's Modalities"
Terence Parsons (UCLA), "Idiosyncrasies of Chapter 12 (On Distributions)"
Joke Spruyt (Maastrict), "Peter of Spain's 'Realism'"
Other confirmed participants include: Peter King (Toronto) Christopher J. Martin (Auckland) , Claude Panaccio (UQAM) and Mikko Yrjonsuuri (Jyvaskyla). The Workshop gratefully acknowledges the assistance of the UCLA Department of Philosophy and of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at UCLA.

CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture 
“Jews, Muslims, and the Passion of Christ: New Images of the Other in Reconquest Iberia”
Tuesday, March 10, 2009

The rapid southward expansion of the northern Iberian kingdoms during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries provoked a spectrum of social changes for the Christians who came to dominate the peninsula. Central among these was a desire to signal their newly preeminent place within a still multiethnic society, in part through a new orientation toward the visual culture of trans-Pyrenean Europe. While this refashioning is most overt in the embrace of Gothic architectural models, in this lecture Pamela A. Patton (Professor of Art History at Meadows, School of the Arts, Southern Methodist University) argues that it can also be traced in the efforts of Christian artists and patrons to invent new visual forms designed to demarcate their own culture more sharply from that of the non-Christians with whom they shared space. One startling example is Passion imagery that seems to elide Jews, as "traditional" enemies of Christ, with Muslims, whose continuing proximity as both subjugated minority and military rival deeply colored Christian perceptions of religious difference. If, as Stephen Greenblatt has claimed, "self-fashioning is achieved in relation to something perceived as alien, strange, or hostile," such works must have figured centrally in such a process, setting the stage for the more sweeping social transformations of the late Middle Ages. This lecture is cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies and the UCLA Department of Art History. View pictures >>

CMRS Faculty Roundtable
“Giordano Bruno in England: A Re-Assessment”
Wednesday, March 11, 2009

A roundtable talk by Hilary Gatti (Dipartimento di Ricerche Storico-filosofiche e pedagogiche, Universitá di Roma “La Sapienza”) who reconsiders Bruno’s visit to London between 1583 and 1585 where he became involved in a number of bitter quarrels and polemics. Professor Gatti attempts to avoid a unilateral celebratory narrative, either of Bruno or of Elizabethan England, in order to underline the extraordinary complexity of the political, religious and cultural situation of the London into which Bruno “a proud Italian exile, and radically independent thinker” found himself catapulted by a series of fortuitous events. View pictures >>

CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture
“Transforming the Medieval into the Modern: Irish Literature in Spanish Flanders”
Wednesday, March 11, 2009
Art and its patronage in late medieval Ireland was different in many respects to contemporary systems of patronage found in Continental Europe. Where their continental counterparts commissioned works of visual art, the Irish aristocracy valued the verbal, and professional poets and scholars sought to provide the verbal galleries their patrons craved and purchased. Defeat at the hands of the English in the Battle of Kinsale (1601) brought many such aristocrats and their men of art to an exile in Spanish Flanders or further afield. As a result, a large body of literature has been transmitted to us that was composed or compiled or conceived of in Flanders or was brought there from Ireland. In this lecture, Professor Ruairí Ó hUiginn (National University of Ireland, Maynooth) will examine some of these works and will attempt to assess them in their new continental context. View pictures >>

Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America
Thursday, March 19 – Saturday, March 21, 2009

CMRS hosts the annual meeting of the Renaissance Society of America (RSA) in Los Angeles. Paper sessions will take place at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza. The annual Bennett Lecture will be presented by David Freedberg (Pierre Matisse Professor of the History of Art, Columbia University) at the Getty Villa on Friday evening; on Saturday, historical demographer Professor Noble David Cook(Florida International University) and writer/editor Kathleen A. Lynch (Carnegie Mellon) will present the Trends Panel on Demographics at UCLA. Advance registration and fee required. To register, or for more information, including the complete program, see RSA’s website at www.rsa.org. See the Renaissance Society of America's website for the complete program. View pictures >>

 

Fall 2009 Winter 2010 Spring 2010
Fall 2008 Winter 2009 Spring 2009
Fall 2007 Winter 2008 Spring 2008
Fall 2006 Winter 2007 Spring 2007
Fall 2005 Winter 2006 Spring 2006
Fall 2004 Winter 2005 Spring 2005
Fall 2003 Winter 2004 Spring 2004
Fall 2002 Winter 2003 Spring 2003
Fall 2001 Winter 2002 Spring 2002
Fall 2000 Winter 2001 Spring 2001

 

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