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Spring 2007

"Towards a History of the Manicule"Fifteenth History of the Book Lecture
April 4, 2007
This lecture, by Professor William H. Sherman (University of York), points the way toward a much needed history of the manicule, the pointing hand symbol used in the margins of many medieval and Renaissance books. Perhaps the most pervasive symbol in the history of texts, it does not have a standard name. It reminds us of the crucial relationship between books and hands between the 13th and 17th centuries and offers new perspective on the digital age. View pictures >>

CMRS Faculty Roundtable, “Christina of Markyate and the St Albans Psalter.”
April 10, 2007
Dr. Jane Geddes (Senior Lecturer, History of Art, King’s College, Aberdeen) discusses the St Albans Psalter, an English manuscript from the 12th century, which was designed to illustrate the life of Christ and the Psalms. But who chose the pictures and why? Behind their theological meaning, these pictures reveal the intense personal relationship between Abbot Geoffrey of St Albans and his beloved Christina of Markyate. View pictures >>

CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar LecturE, “Rituals of Departure for Crusade”
April 18, 2007
In this lecture, CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar William Jordan (Dayton-Stockton Professor of History, Princeton University), draws upon his earlier work, recent research, and the exciting contributions of upcoming scholars, to address the ceremonies through which medieval crusaders prepared themselves to leave their homes and families for wars in the Near East. These ceremonies hint at the range of tensions, as well as the hopes and fears, that the decision to go on crusade generated. View pictures >>

The Thirtieth Symposium on Portuguese Traditions
SIMPÓSIO XXX
April 21, 2007 and April 22, 2007
The UCLA Department of Spanish and Portugese, in cooperation with the Latin American Center, the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and the Romance Linguistics and Literature Program, is pleased to announce the thirtieth annual symposium on the global world of portugese traditions - Europe, America, Africa, Asia. The Symposium traditionally has no fixed theme and welcomes the widest range of pertinent topics. papers may be presented in English or Portugese and are limited to fifteen minutes reading time. Registration forms, programs of recent Symposiums, and contents of recent issues of Encruzilhadas/Crossroads may be found at www.humnet.ucla.edu/spanport/portsymp/portsympmain.html. Registration is $50 ($40 before March 15th); no fee for UCLA students, faculty, and staff.

CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture, “Cervantes and Shakespeare: The Middle Ages in Renaissance Garb”
April 24, 2007
A lecture by CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Dr. Fernando Cervantes, Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Bristol. View pictures >>

CMRS Faculty Roundtable
April 25, 2007
A talk by Professor Shane Butler (Classics, UCLA), “A Brief History of the Page, in the Form of a Palimpsest” tracing the remarkable persistence of the page throughout the history of writing, from waxed tablets to cyberspace, offering a few thoughts on what pages really do. Prof. Butler presents some of the introductory material from his just-finished book, The Matter of the Page. View pictures >>

CMRS Co-sponsored Lecture
May 1, 2007

“A Renaissance Commemoration of Raphael or a Romantic Obsession: A Second Version of the Madonna della Seggiola,” presented by Ken Bartlett (Professor of Renaissance Studies, Victoria College, University of Toronto) and co-sponsored by the UCLA Department of Italian. View pictures >>

Annual Shakespeare Symposium
May 5, 2007

“Shakespeare's Couples, Shakespeare's Couplings”
The conference program and registration form are posted at www.cmrs.ucla.edu/programs/shakespeare_2007.pdf. View pictures >>

CMRS Faculty Roundtable
May 9, 2007
Professor Rebecca Emigh (Sociology, UCLA) discusses economic and social evolution in fifteenth-century Tuscany: “The Unmaking of Markets: A Composite Visual History.” Visual composites are new methodological devices that combine images from disparate sources to provide more detailed information than would be otherwise possible. Like other microhistorical or ethnographic techniques, they make it possible to explore the lives of ordinary individuals in the distant past. The composites support the substantive argument that the transition to full scale industrial capitalism did not occur in fifteenth-century Tuscany because the spread of urban capitalist markets paradoxically eroded rural market institutions, making it impossible for the majority of the Tuscan population to anticipate in markets. In rural regions, well-developed markets for land, labor, credit, and commodities existed and were linked to cultural practices of property devolution and agricultural production. However, when wealthy Florentines purchased land in these regions, rural inhabitants were priced out of these markets and their cultural and economic activities were delinked from them. Thus, capitalist markets unmade themselves as they spread in Tuscany. View pictures >>

CMRS Co-sponsored Lecture
May 10, 2007
“Illustrating Ethnicity in the Middle Ages,” presented by Robert Bartlett (Professor of Medieval History, University of St Andrews) and co-sponsored by the UCLA Department of History. View pictures >>

California Medieval History Seminar
May 12, 2007
The California Medieval History Seminar meets at the Huntington Library to discuss pre-distributed research papers. Participants are expected to have read the papers in advance and come prepared to discuss them. The California Medieval History Seminar is supported by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, as well as the CMRS, the Huntington Library, and the Caltech Huntington Committee for the Humanities.

Annual Will & Lois Matthews Samuel Pepys Lecture
May 14, 2007

Professor Caroline Barron (Professor of the History of London, Royal Holloway, University of London), this year’s guest speaker, will discuss social and political life in later medieval London. A dinner (by letter of invitation only) for CMRS faculty and friends follows. View pictures >>

CMRS Co-sponsored Lecture, “The Marvellous Inventions of Aethicus the Istrian Philosopher and Cosmography: Ruminations on the Last Latin Novel”
May 22, 2007
Professor Michael Herren (York University and the University of Toronto) is a specialist in the Medieval Latin literature of Britain and Ireland and his visit to UCLA is co-sponsored by the Department of English. He has written several books, among them a two-volume critical edition of the Hisperica Famina, a translation of Aldhelm's prose writings, and a critical edition of the poetry of John Scottus Eriugena. Since 1990 he has served as the editor of The Journal of Medieval Latin. Says our speaker: "This talk offers a virtual gryphon safari in Scythia, skiing in the Riphaean Mountains, a visit to the dens of the Amazons, and a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the unclean races immured behind the Caspian Gates. We'll also get a close look at the submarine Alexander rode in, learn about a hydraulic siege engine operated by a bellows, and hear the description of a special ship designed to shoot Greek fire. Along the way we'll learn how St. Jerome preserved the story of the inventions of Aethicus the Istrian Philosopher for posterity, and how the Irish didn't save civilization after all."

CMRS Faculty Roundtable, “Dante in Hebrew Renaissance Literature”
May 29, 2007
This roundtable will investigate why Dante was felt to be so important by Jewish scholars and poets in the Renaissance. The focus will be on philosophy and poetry. Dr. Rossella Pescatori (Lecturer, Italian, UCLA) will deal with Dante in Leone Ebreo's Dialoghi d’amore. Prof. Fabrizio Lelli (Visiting Professor, Italian, UCLA) will discuss Dante's influence on Renaissance Hebrew poetry. View pictures >>

CMRS Co-sponsored Lecture, “‘Stepmother and Destroyer of Virtues’: History Writing for Medieval Women?”
June 6, 2007

Professor Jocelyn Wogan-Browne (Chair in Later Medieval Literature, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York) has focused on medieval women and their reading communities, medieval virginities, and saints’ lives. She is the author of Saints’ Lives and the Literary Culture of Women, c. 1150-c. 1300: Virginity and its Authorizations (Oxford UP, 2001). She has also edited or translated numerous collections of texts and studies, among them Guidance for Women in Twelfth-Century Convents; Virgin Lives and Holy Deaths; Voicing Medieval Women; and Medieval English Prose for Women. She was lead editor of the influential collaborative anthology The Idea of the Vernacular: An Anthology of Middle English Literary Theory, 1350-1520 (Penn State Press, 1999). Currently, Prof. Wogan-Browne is working on a collaborative NEH-funded research project in the French of medieval England, including a ‘mapping’ volume entitled The French of England: Vernacular Literary Theory and Practices, c. 1130-1450; a translation of two of Matthew Paris's French lives of saints, and the academic editing of a further ten commissioned volumes of translations and text samples from the French of England (FRETS - the French of England Translation Series). View pictures >>

 

Fall 2009 Winter 2010 Spring 2010
Fall 2008 Winter 2009 Spring 2009
Fall 2007 Winter 2008 Spring 2008
Fall 2006 Winter 2007 Spring 2007
Fall 2005 Winter 2006 Spring 2006
Fall 2004 Winter 2005 Spring 2005
Fall 2003 Winter 2004 Spring 2004
Fall 2002 Winter 2003 Spring 2003
Fall 2001 Winter 2002 Spring 2002
Fall 2000 Winter 2001 Spring 2001

 

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