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Spring 2003

The Annual Will & Lois Matthews Samuel Pepys Lecture - Wednesday, April 2, 2003
Professor Michael J. B. Allen (English, UCLA) presents the Center's annual Samuel Pepys lecture.

Tenth Annual History of the Book Lecture, "Reading and Meditation in Late Medieval Devotional Manuscripts"
April 4, 2003

Dr. Sylvia Huot (Pembroke College, Cambridge), noted for her expertise in the field of Medieval French manuscripts and literature, presents this year's History of the Book Lecture. She will discuss devotional manuscripts used in the education and edification of both children and adults in fourteenth-century France, and consider how the process of reading became a basis for meditation, prayer, and self-scrutiny. The History of the Book Lecture is supported entirely by the generosity of donors. If you would like to support the series, please contact CMRS for more information, at cmrs@humnet.ucla.edu or 310-825-1880.

California Medieval History Seminar
April 5, 2003
The California Medieval History Seminar meets at the Huntington Library to discuss four, pre-distributed research papers (two by faculty members, two by graduate students or recent Ph.D. recipients). Presenters and paper titles are announced by e-mail approximately 6-8 weeks before the meeting. Participants are expected to have read the papers in advance and come prepared to discuss them. To promote an active discussion, attendance is limited. In 2001-2002, the California Medieval History Seminar was supported by: the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies; the California Institute of Technology; the University of Southern California, Department of History; the UCLA, Department of History; the UC Davis Medieval Research Consortium; the UCLA Dean of Social Sciences; the Huntington Library; and the Huntington-Caltech Committee for the Humanities. The program has received a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for the next three years, beginning Fall 2002.

CMRS Faculty Roundtable
April 9, 2003

The Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies announces its first Spring 2003 Faculty Roundtable. Professor Anthony Pagden (Political Science & History), will discuss, "What is an 'Empire'?" Talk of "empire" and "imperialism" has heated up of late. All too often the word is employed either as a metaphor or merely as a term of abuse. So what is an empire? And how has the meaning of the term shifted since it first appeared during the Roman Principate through the Middle Ages and beyond? And what use is it to us today? CMRS faculty, associates, graduate students, and friends are invited to attend. Bring your lunch! The Center will provide refreshments.

“Between Germany and Poland, Jewish Life and Ceremonies In Early Twentieth-Century Illustrated Postcards”
April 21, 2003
A lecture by CMRS Visting Professor Shalom Sabar (Chair, Jewish and Comparataive Folklore Program, Department of Art History, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem). Professor Sabar has studied the image of the Jew in popular culture from the Renaissance to the present day. In this lecture, which will be illustrated with slides, he discusses pictures drawn from twentieth-century postcards.

Between Jews and Christians in Renaissance Italy: In the Mirror of Art
April 22, 2003
CMRS Visiting Professor Shalom Sabar (Chair, Jewish and Comparative Folklore, Hebrew University, Jerusalem) examines the image of the Jew in Italy during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, in part through comparison with images produced in Germany at the same time. His lecture, which will consider both "high" art and popular images, will point out some of the major differences between the two countries, as evidenced in art, and show the "Jewish" reaction through polemical images produced by or for Jews.

CMRS Faculty Roundtable
April 23, 2003
The Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies announces its next Spring 2003 Faculty Roundtable. Stanley Wells, director of the Shakespeare Centre at Stratford-upon-Avon, will discuss "Lewd Interpreters of Shakespeare." Prof. Wells is well known for his many editions and studies of Shakespeare. His presentation will attempt to distinguish between legitimate readings-between-the-lines and over- readings that are ahistorical and sometimes untheatrical in imposing upon the texts meanings that must originate in the minds of the interpreters rather than of the dramatists. When do sexual interpretations proceed from what would once have been considered the "dirty minds" of the interpreters rather than from the imaginations of the dramatist and of his early audiences? Theatrical and critical interpretations of A Midsummer Night's Dream provide a focus for this discussion. CMRS faculty, associates, graduate students, and friends are invited to attend. Bring your lunch! The Center will provide refreshments.

CMRS Film Lecture, “Listening for Love: Shakespeare-Film-Music”
April 30, 2003

Dr. James Westby (Ph.D. Musicology, UCLA), will discuss the dramatic strategies evident in the use of music in three film versions of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: George Cukor, 1936, starring Norma Shearer and Leslie Howard; Franco Zeffirelli, 1966, starring Olivia Hussey and Leonard Whiting; and Baz Luhrman, 1996, starring Clare Danes and Leonardo DiCaprio.

“Art y Politica: Santa Rosa de Lima y los origenes religiosos del criollismo virreinal americano”
May 6, 2003

A lecture by Ramón Mujica, researcher at the Universidad Mayor de San Marcos, and a leading scholar in the field of Peruvian history and iconology. His major books include: Angeles apócrifos en la América virreinal (1992) and Rosa limensis: mística, politica e iconografía en torno a la patrona de América (2001). This program is sponsored by the Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies and the Department of Spanish & Portuguese.

CMRS Faculty Roundtable, “Is there a Perfect Commonwealth? Raphael Hythloday Between Plato and Epicurus.”
May 7, 2003

With Professor Giulia Sissa (Political Science and Classics, UCLA); the question about the best form of government dominates ancient political thought. Thomas More rephrases it in Utopia, a conversation on the optimus status rei publicae. But who is Raphael Hythloday, the man who visited that impossible world? And what kind of philosophical language does he speak concerning both commonality and pleasure? CMRS faculty, associates, graduate students, and friends are invited to attend. Bring your lunch! The Center will provide refreshments.

“Medieval and Renaissance Survivals in the Baroque Art of Viceregal Peru”
May 7, 2003

A lecture by Ramón Mujica, researcher at the Universidad Mayor de San Marcos, and a leading scholar in the field of Peruvian history and iconology. His major books include: Angeles apócrifos en la América virreinal (1992) and Rosa limensis: mística, politica e iconografía en torno a la patrona de América (2001). This program is sponsored by the Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies and the Department of Spanish & Portuguese.

The Annual Shakespeare Symposium: Othello
May 10, 2003
Each year, the Center hosts a symposium devoted to an in-depth examination of one of Shakespeare's works. This year's symposium, coordinated by CMRS Associate and Shakespeare authority Professor Stanley Stewart (English, UC Riversde) considers Othello. The Shakespeare Symposium is supported in part by the generosity of donors. If you would like to contribute, please contact the Center at cmrs@humnet.ucla.edu or 310-825-1880.

The UCLA Byzantinists' Colloquium: Byzantium and the Slavic World
May 17, 2003
The Empire of Byzantium and its Slavic neighbors formed what has been called "The Byzantine Commonwealth." Byzantium's efforts at bringing Orthodox Christianity to the Slavs provided a common cultural ground and generated a shared artistic tradition in eastern Europe; trade and commerce resulted in common economic interests, while political ambitions on both sides often brought confrontation and conflict. This conference, coordinated by Professor Claudia Rapp (History, UCLA), will explore Byzantium's interaction with and lasting influence on the Slavic world.

CMRS Faculty Roundtable, “Must be seen to be Believed: The Siting of Santa Maria Maggiore in Rome.”
May 21, 2003

With Professor Diane Favro (Architecture and Urban Design, UCLA). In Rome's sweltering heat of August 352, the Blessed Mary told Pope Liberius and the patrician John she would send a miraculous snowfall to indicate the location for a new church in her honor. The sanctified flakes marked out the plan of the great basilica later known as Santa Maria Maggiore on the Cispian Hill in eastern Rome. Or so medieval legend would have us believe. In fact, this revisionist story obscures both the building's actual date of construction and the original determinants for site selection. Looking through a Christianized lens, historians have tended to consider the new basilica's placement primarily in relation to subsequent church history and urban imperatives. Yet when construction began in the fifth century, other factors also came into play. In contrast to earlier Christian churches in Rome, that to Mary was highly visible in the cityscape. This basilica was designed to be seen. When evaluated in the context of fifth-century Rome, the site of the new basilica reflects notions of view planning from Rome's not-too-distant pagan Imperial past, exploiting both Christian and pagan topographical and visual associations. CMRS faculty, associates, graduate students, and friends are invited to attend. Bring your lunch! The Center will provide refreshments.

“Lynn White and the Invention of Medieval and Renaissance Technology”
May 22, 2003
Professor Kelly DeVries (History, Loyola College, Baltimore) will discuss the importance of the work of the late Professor Lynn White, the first director of CMRS, to the history of technology.

“Aspects of Equus”
May 23, 2003

Encouraged by recent developments in "equischolarship," this conference will consider representations, interpretations, and valorizations of the horse in medieval and early modern culture. In addition to papers on topics ranging from “Dante Equestrian” to the role of the horse in Carolingian warfare, the program will include music by Musica Humana, group dancing, and a reception. Among the speakers are Kelly DeVries (Loyola College, Baltimore) and John Langdon (University of Alberta).

“Chaucer and the Challenges of Medievalism: A Conference in Honor of Henry Ansgar Kelly”
June 5-6, 2003

A two-day conference, coordinated by Professors Donka Minkova (English, UCLA) and Theresa Tinkle (English, University of Michigan), to honor Professor Henry Ansgar Kelly as he completes his term as Director of CMRS.

 

Fall 2009 Winter 2010 Spring 2010
Fall 2008 Winter 2009 Spring 2009
Fall 2007 Winter 2008 Spring 2008
Fall 2006 Winter 2007 Spring 2007
Fall 2005 Winter 2006 Spring 2006
Fall 2004 Winter 2005 Spring 2005
Fall 2003 Winter 2004 Spring 2004
Fall 2002 Winter 2003 Spring 2003
Fall 2001 Winter 2002 Spring 2002
Fall 2000 Winter 2001 Spring 2001

 

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