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Spring 2002

The Seventh Annual UCLA Graduate Late Antiquity Conference
April 6, 2002

This conference brings together scholars of diverse interests for a day of presentations and discussion of the range of issues surrounding the transformation of the Classical world into the Latin Medieval West, Byzantium and the Islamic world. Sponsored by the University of California Multicampus Research Grant on the History and Culture of Late Antiquity, and the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

"Crossroads. Place and Visual Culture in Twelfth-Century Sicily"
April 15, 2002
This lecture by William Tronzo (Professor of Art History, New Orleans) is one in a series of medieval lectures presented by the UCLA Department of Art History and co-sponsored by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

CMRS Faculty Roundtable, "Space as Allegory: The Medieval Heritage of 17th-century Dutch Painting"
April 24, 2002
Martha Hollander
will discuss the origins of 17th-century Dutch spatial composition in medieval and Renaissance pictorial forms. Dutch painters ingeniously used devices such as archways, open doors, corridor views, niches, and pictures-within-pictures to organize and enrich their images of social life. These devices, dividing the picture into primary and secondary spaces, in fact come from a long tradition, beginning with medieval narrative cycles and continuing in the 16th century with the format of emblems and stage design. The explanatory or ironic use of secondary pictures and scenes in 17th-century Dutch painting, particularly interiors, is essentially a modernized version of the multi-picture format so prevalent in European visual culture. CMRS faculty, associates, Council members, staff, and graduate students are invited to attend. Bring you lunch! The Center will provide soft drinks and coffee.

"Imagined Borders: The Problem of Frontiers in Islamic and Christian Arts in Medieval Spain"
April 29, 2002
This lecture by Jerrilyn Dobbs (Adjunct Professor of Architecture, Columbia University) is one in a series of medieval lectures presented by the UCLA Department of Art History and co-sponsored by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

"Memory and History in Late Medieval and Early Modern Spain"
May 1, 2002
Memory and history have often been presented as incompatible concepts. Against memory's personal, sentimental, and not always rational characteristics, we postulate history as a way to study and understand the past in a logical and dispassionate fashion. CMRS Visiting Professor in the History Department, Adeline Rucquoi (Centre de Recherches Historiques, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales) examines this subject in the context of late medieval and early modern Spain. In Castile, the confrontation between a court-generated "national history" and the histories of individual cities, written throughout the realm and reaching a high point in the sixteenth century, allows us to problematize the meaning of history and its relation to memory.

"Renaissance Culture in Seventeenth-Century China: Some Methodological Questions"
May 2, 2002
A lecture by Nicolas Standaert (Professor of Chinese Studies, K.U. Leuven, Belgium). The Renaissance culture that the Jesuits brought to China in the early seventeenth century included a wide variety of subjects: the Ortelius' worldmap, the Aristotelian philosophy from Coimbra, the anatomical writings of A. Paré, Cardano's astrology, Flemish engravings, etc. Chinese scholars reacted in various ways to this European knowledge. This presentation will not only give an overview of the major aspects of the dissemination of Renaissance culture to China. It will also discuss the various methods in which this transmission is studied at present.

CMRS Council Event (by invitation only)
May 3, 2002
Attention CMRS Council members: Save this date!

A Symposium on The Virtual Romanesque Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela
May 7, 2002
The public is cordially invited to attend a Symposium on "The Virtual Romanesque Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela." The event consists of viewing the virtual reality model of the cathedral as it was at the time of its dedication in 1211, followed by a symposium on the Tomb of the Apostle. Presenters will include: John Williams (Distinguished Service Professor of History of Art and Architecture Emeritus, University of Pittsburgh) "History as Myth: Myth as History: The Tomb of the Apostle at Santiago de Compostela" and José Suárez Otero (Archeologist and Conservator, Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela) "From Antiquity to the Middle Ages: The Tomb of the Apostle St. James at Compostela." Viewings of the model will be in UCLA's Visualization Portal on the day of the symposium at 1:30pm & 2:30pm. Pre-registration REQUIRED for viewings, contact Tram Tran at 310-206-9933 or tramtran@humnet.ucla.edu. See www.ats.ucla.edu/portal/location.htm for Visualization Portal directions and location and www.humnet.ucla.edu/santiago/cathdedicprog.htm for more information on the symposium and model.

CMRS Faculty Roundtable, "Maestro Martino at the Court of his Gastronomic Eminence, Cardinal Ludovico Trevisan"
May 8, 2002
With Professor Luigi Ballerini (Italian, UCLA). An embarrassingly large number of recipes included in Platina's De Honesta Voluptate (second half of the Quattrocento) were "lifted" from the Libro de Arte coquinaria by Maestro Martino who cooked for Cardinal Ludovico Trevisan and possibly for the Condottiere Gian Giacomo Trivulzio. Of the four extant manuscripts of Martino's work, one ended up in the Medieval Collection of the Library of Congress. The first English translation of this exceptionally modern cookbook will be released by UC Press in the Spring of 2003. Not only is the Libro the first culinary guide to specify ingredients, cooking times, utensils and dosages, it is also an essential document to understand the forms of conviviality developing in Central Italy. Despite the northern origin of both employers, as well as of the employee, it is Rome - brought back to life by Pope Martin V and his successors - that serves as principal background against which to gauge Martino's culinary achievements. CMRS faculty, associates, Council members, staff, and graduate students are invited to attend. Bring you lunch! The Center will provide soft drinks and coffee.

"Women and Renaissance Theater: Playwrights and Performers"
May 10, 2002
In the last decade, scholars working in the area of Renaissance women authors have increasingly turned to studying and editing texts by female playwrights who wrote in a variety of dramatic genres. At the same time, researchers have also attempted to assess the role of women as actors and directors in the world of Renaissance theater. In general, this research has focused on texts and performances within a particular country, but this year's CMRS conference on women and gender will bring together specialists from the English, French, Italian, and Spanish Renaissance theatrical worlds in order to address the role of Renaissance women in writing, performing, and presenting drama from an international and cross-cultural perspective. Featured speakers will include: Professors Margaret Ferguson (English, UC Davis), Eve Sanders (English, Concordia University, Montreal), Cynthia Skenazi (French, UC Santa Barbara), Teresa Soufas (Spanish, Tulane University), and Elissa Weaver (Romance Languages and Literature, University of Chicago). The program will feature dramatic readings of selections from some of the texts under discussion.

Annual Hammer Foundation Lecture and Dinner
May 15, 2002
Thomas Kren
(Curator of Manuscripts, J. Paul Getty Museum) will present this year's Hammer Foundation Lecture for CMRS faculty, associates, and Council members. Dr. Kren will discuss the study of illuminated manuscripts and medieval cultural history.

Second Annual UCLA Medieval and Early Modern Interdisciplinary Forum, "The Illuminated Folklorist: Working with the Folk Cultures of the Past"
May 17-19, 2002
There is a compelling need for cross-disciplinary dialogue about what scholars can know about the folklore of the past, how that knowledge enriches our understanding of cultures, and how we may use information about pre-industrial folk cultures responsibly. This conference will bring together scholars, students, and faculty from various disciplines.

CMRS Faculty Roundtable, Philip Brett, "Byrd's Soul Authority"
May 22, 2002
Professor Philip Brett (Musicology) discusses "Byrd's Soul Authority." The role of William Byrd (1540-1623) in Elizabethan musical culture is in some ways strikingly similar to that of his younger contemporary Edmund Spenser (1554-1599) in the literary sphere. Both had a sense of history, both cultivated (as Louis Montrose has argued in relation to Spenser) "a distinctive and culturally authoritative authorial persona" through appropriating print, both received royal appointments or favors. A great difference lies in their religious lives, for Byrd remained an ardent Roman Catholic, and courted danger in befriending Jesuit priests. Under pressure of religious conviction, Professor Brett argues, Byrd's carefully constucted indigenous authorial voice was slowly undermined by an inward expressiveness upon which later generations have constructed his greatness but which his contemporary audience, outside the Roman enclave, virtually ignored.CMRS faculty, associates, Council members, staff, and graduate students are invited to attend. Bring your lunch! The Center will provide soft drinks and coffee.

California Medieval History Seminar, Spring 2002
June 1, 2002
The California Medieval History Seminar meets at the Huntington Library to discuss four, pre-distributed research papers (two by faculty members, two by graduate students or recent Ph.D. recipients). Participants are expected to have read the papers in advance and come prepared to discuss them. To promote an active discussion, attendance is limited. Presenters and paper titles are announced by e-mail approximately 6-8 weeks before the meeting. The California Medieval History Seminar is supported by the generosity of a number of sponsors, including: the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the UCLA Dean of Social Science, the California Institute of Technology, the History Department of the University of California, the History Department of UCLA, California State University Long Beach, the Huntington Library, and the Huntington-Caltech Committee for the Humanities.

"Byte-sized Middle Ages: Medievalism, Film, and the Digital Imagination"
June 6, 2002
A lecture by Dr. Courtney M. Booker (History, UCLA); in the early 1960s, many readers of J. R. R. Tolkien's novel The Lord of the Rings imagined the book's medieval fantasy world as a boundless place, filled with mystery, grandeur, and historical depth. Three decades later, the same book has been interpreted for screen audiences largely in terms of action-of chases, skirmishes, battles, and so on-frenetic images reflective, I would suggest, of a sensibility wrought by the virtual reality of computer games. I will discuss in historical perspective some of the ways in which this modern visual/cinematic imagination of the Middle Ages has come to rely upon and be shaped by a shared stock of stylized referents related to the virtual reality of computers. How and when this shift came about is the focus of the discussion.

 

Fall 2009 Winter 2010 Spring 2010
Fall 2008 Winter 2009 Spring 2009
Fall 2007 Winter 2008 Spring 2008
Fall 2006 Winter 2007 Spring 2007
Fall 2005 Winter 2006 Spring 2006
Fall 2004 Winter 2005 Spring 2005
Fall 2003 Winter 2004 Spring 2004
Fall 2002 Winter 2003 Spring 2003
Fall 2001 Winter 2002 Spring 2002
Fall 2000 Winter 2001 Spring 2001

 

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