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Fall 2008

CMRS Open House
Wednesday, October 15, 2008

The Center invites faculty and students with an interest in medieval and Renaissance Studies to attend an Open House marking the beginning of the new academic year. Meet the Center’s staff and learn about CMRS programs, awards, and fellowships. View pictures >>

The Eighteenth History of the Book Lecture
“Archimedes in Bits: The Digital Presentation of a Write-Off”
Friday, October 17, 2008

After ten years of conservation, imaging, and research, the project to retrieve the erased texts from a thirteenth-century Byzantine palimpsest —the unique source for three treatises by the ancient Greek mathematician Archimedes—is nearing completion. The results have been extraordinary, changing scholarly perception of Archimedes' contribution to the western tradition of mathematical thought, and revealing entirely new texts from the ancient world. In this lecture, Dr. William Noel, Curator of Manuscripts and Rare Books at the Walters Art Museum, and Director of the Archimedes palimpsest project, will discuss the project, and present the results.  The History of the Book Lecture series is supported entirely by the generosity of donors. View pictures >>

CJS Faculty/Student Seminar
“Jews, Masons, and Cabalists: The Renaissance as Ideology and the Italian Risorgimento”
Monday, October 27, 2008
A talk by Professor Brian P. Copenhaver (Philosophy, and History, UCLA, and CMRS Director) for the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies’s Faculty/Student Seminar Series. Go to podcast >>

CMRS Faculty Roundtable
“Dancing With the Stars of 1476 and 1588”
Tuesday, October 28, 2008

Early Italian manuscripts translated into performance reveal choreographies that instructed and amused amateur noble performers, adding rhythm and drama to entertainment evenings in Italian courtly settings. Throughout Italy, Domenico was the arbiter of good dance from ca. 1440 on. A century later one can argue that his place was usurped by Thoinot Arbeau, a French clergyman from Langres, who in 1588 wrote and published a widely circulated book that documents a radical change in dance style one hundred years later. Dancing mirrors the social, political, and economic worldviews of these quite different historical eras. Professor Emma Lewis Thomas (World Arts and Cultures, UCLA) discusses fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Renaissance dance. Specific dances and steps will be demonstrated by several dancers. View pictures >>

“Thinking in Lines: Representing Genealogy in the High and Late Middle Ages”
Thursday, November 6, 2008

The historian Bill Kent has noted “the tendency, ubiquitous in medieval society, to see areas of feeling and experience through kinship colored glasses,” but art historians have hardly noted that imagery with genealogical content was everywhere in the Middle Ages: on walls and in books, sculpted and painted. In this lecture, Professor Joan A. Holladay (Art and Art History, University of Texas at Austin) will examine this phenomenon, considering some specific examples, their audiences, functions, and social or political contexts. Co-sponsored by the Department of Art History, the Arts Council, and CMRS. View pictures >>

CMRS Faculty Roundtable
“The Old French Translation of Gratian’s Decretum: A New Proof of the Translator’s Identity”
Wednesday, November 12, 2008

Albeit preserved in a Central French copy, the OFr translation of Gratian’s Decretumcan be attributed to an Anglo-Norman because of its dialectal words and technical terms, and also because of its nominal as well as verbal morphology. It represents an early form of Decretum and it seems to have already influenced literature in the late twelfth century. The language and age of the translation allow a tentative attribution to Thomas Becket. This attribution is encouraged by the closeness of the translation to the Getty Latin MS Ludwig XIV:2, the latter thought to have been prepared for Thomas Becket’s exile court. But as Dr. Leena Löfstedt (CMRS Associate, and University of Helsinki) demonstrates in this talk, an even better proof of the identity of the translator can be found in the translation itself, where a tiny omission creates a legal text fit to support a thought of Becket’s. View pictures >>

CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture
“Managing Emotion in the Byzantine Twelfth Century: The Consolations of Rhetoric”
Wednesday, November 12, 2008
In this lecture, CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Margaret Mullett (Queen’s University Belfast) demonstrates that Byzantine consolationes in prose and verse—speeches, poems and letters—are anything but literary exercises; rather, they use the power of rhetoric to serve the bereaved. Professor Mullett will consider reactions to death in Byzantium, the representation and conception of emotion, portraiture (of deceased and bereaved), and the potential of different literary (and visual) forms. View pictures >>

“In a Contested Realm: the Historical Architecture of Northern Cyprus”
Thursday, November 13, 2008

The story of the historical architecture of a divided Cyprus is a tragic one. In this lecture, art historian Dr. Allan Langdale (UC Santa Cruz) conveys the unparalleled richness of the historical architecture of northern Cyprus with dramatic images and discusses the political complications of the region in regard to the preservation of cultural heritage. Cosponsored by CMRS and the UCLA Department of Art History. View pictures >>

CMRS Film Screening 
“The Stones of Famagusta: the Story of a Forgotten City”
Thursday, November 13, 2008
Art historian and filmaker Dr. Allan Langdale takes you on a bicycle tour of the once famous medieval city of Famagusta, Cyprus. Once considered the world's richest city, Famagusta is now largely forgotten by the West. Explore the wonders of the gothic churches and monasteries, the ruins of Venetian palaces, the fabulous two-mile long walls and moat, Byzantine churches, Ottoman baths, and some of Famagusta's unique and mysterious underground churches. View pictures >>

CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture
“The Significance of the Baltic Languages for Reconstruction of Indo-European”
Tuesday, November 18, 2008

The generally archaic state of the Baltic languages went largely unnoticed until the beginning of the nineteenth century, when scholars such as Rask recognized that Baltic was not just a mixture of other branches of the Indo-European language family. It was not until the latter half of the century, however, that the scholarly community became aware of the existence of tonal contrasts, which could subsequently be linked to similar phenomena in Slavic and appeared to have an Indo-European background. In the course of the twentieth century, our increasing knowledge of the prosodic systems (stress patterns and tonal contrasts) of the Baltic languages gave rise to new theories about the origin of these systems, some of which have far-reaching implications for the evaluation of Baltic evidence in the context of comparative Indo-European linguistics. In this lecture, CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Dr. Rick Derksen (Department of Comparative Indo-European Linguistics, Leiden University) explores these phenomena and implications.

CMRS Faculty Roundtable
“Imagination or Reality? Fantastical Beasts in Medieval Art and Thought”
Tuesday, December 2, 2008
In medieval manuscripts, familiar creatures like hedgehogs and weasels appear next to equally lively depictions of unicorns and dragons. For medieval readers, were these creatures actual inhabitants of the earth or symbols of the frightening possibilities beyond the known world? Dr. Elizabeth Morrison (Curator, Department of Manuscripts, the J. Paul Getty Museum) explores the role of fantastic animals in the Middle Ages. View pictures >>

“Queer Shakes”
Thursday, December 4, 2008
Even though Shakespeare has often been queered, queer theory has rarely been Shaken. Can Shakespeare queer theory as much as theory has queered Shakespeare? In this talk, Professor Madhavi Menon (Department of Literature, American University) will think through the implications of what it means to have a two-way conversation between Shakespeare and queer theory such that the one is not simply at the receiving end of the other. Co-sponsored by the UCLA Department of English and CMRS. View pictures >>

 

Fall 2009 Winter 2010 Spring 2010
Fall 2008 Winter 2009 Spring 2009
Fall 2007 Winter 2008 Spring 2008
Fall 2006 Winter 2007 Spring 2007
Fall 2005 Winter 2006 Spring 2006
Fall 2004 Winter 2005 Spring 2005
Fall 2003 Winter 2004 Spring 2004
Fall 2002 Winter 2003 Spring 2003
Fall 2001 Winter 2002 Spring 2002
Fall 2000 Winter 2001 Spring 2001

 

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