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Fall 2006

“The Contribution of the Vienna School to the Historical Ethnography of the Early Middle Ages”
October 5, 2006

A seminar by Dr. Herwig Wolfram (Emeritus Director, Austrian Institute for Historical Research). Co-sponsored by the Department of History and the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. View pictures >>

CMRS Open House
October 10, 2006

The Center invites faculty and students with an interest in Medieval and Renaissance Studies to attend an open house marking the beginning of the new academic year. Meet the Center’s staff and learn about CMRS programs, awards, and fellowships. View pictures >>

CMRS Roundtable, “The Islamic Interpretation of the Crusade: a New (Old) Paradigm for Understanding the Crusades.”
October 18, 2006

A talk by Dr. Paul Chevedden (History, Santa Monica College) discussing his recent article in Der Islam. Islamic interpretation of the Crusade is an encompassing theory that enjoyed canonical status in the Muslim historiographical tradition. In its broad general outline, it is historically accurate and can be corroborated by papal documents. Its influence extended beyond the confines of Islamic historiography, becoming part of the main historiographical tradition of the Middle East, yet it remains unknown. Although the Islamic interpretation of the Crusade is capable of giving fruitful insights and is capable of guiding future research in the field of Crusade studies, modern scholarship, whether in the West or in the Muslim world, has passed over this interpretation of the Crusade as irrelevant. Dr. Chevedden explains the Islamic interpretation of the Crusade and discusses some of the reasons why a historically verifiable and historically accurate explanation of the Crusade has been ignored for so long. The Islamic interpretation of the Crusade offers a way out of the current impasse into which Crusade history has fallen. It is the only explanation of the Crusade that is authentically "traditionalist," with the authority of a real tradition behind it, and authentically "pluralist," with no hierarchical scale of crusading wars, and it is the only explanation of the Crusade that can claim to be based on the direct evidence. View pictures >>

CMRS Roundtable, “An Oblique Look at a Medieval Translator’s Work”
November 1, 2006

In this discussion, Dr. Leena Löfstedt (CMRS Associate) compares the Latin text of Gratian’s Decretum in J.Paul Getty Center MS 83. MQ. 163 : MS Ludwig XIV:2 (ca. 1180, Sens or, maybe preferably, Paris), and the Old French translation of the text (late 12th c., Plantagenêt French) preserved in MS Bruxelles, BR 9084 (ca. 1280, Central French). The Ludwig MS corresponds very well to the Old French translation. Moreover, it has several interlineary and marginal annotations that are of interest for the study of the translation and may shed some light on the fate of both texts. View pictures >>

CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture, “Cutting Both Ways: Bloodletting, Castration/Circumcision and the 'Launcelet' or Knife of the Merchant of Venice
November 7, 2006

A lecture by CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Patricia Parker (Margery Bailey Professor in English and Dramatic Literature, and Professor of Comparative Literature, Stanford University) sponsored by CMRS and the Department of English Early Modern/Renaissance Reading Group.

CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture, “Sound Government and (Shakespeare’s) Sound Jests”
November 8, 2006

A lecture by CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Patricia Parker (Margery Bailey Professor in English and Dramatic Literature, and Professor of Comparative Literature, Stanford University). View pictures >>

California Medieval History Seminar
November 11, 2006

The California Medieval History Seminar meets at the Huntington Library to discuss pre-distributed research papers. Participants are expected to have read the papers in advance and come prepared to discuss them. The California Medieval History Seminar is supported by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, as well as the CMRS, the Huntington Library, and the Caltech Huntington Committee for the Humanities.

CMRS Roundtable, “Satan, Hell, and Limbo: Late Developments”
November 15, 2006

Professor Henry Ansgar Kelly (English, UCLA) discusses his recently published book Satan, a Biography (Cambridge University Press). An interview with Prof. Kelly appears in the October 2006 "UCLA Magazine" and can be read online at www.magazine.ucla.edu/depts/style/devil-you-dont-know. View pictures >>

“The Past and Future of Close Reading”
Critical Perspectives on Luso-Hispanic Studies, Lecture Series
November 27, 2006

Roland Greene (English and Comparative Literature and Head of the Division of Literatures, Cultures and Languages, Stanford University) presents “The Past and Future of Close Reading”. Professor Greene's research has addressed the problems and opportunities of comparative literature, focusing particularly on interactions among transatlantic and hemispheric literatures and cultures. Recent work in early modern studies includes Unrequited Conquests: Love and Empire in the Colonial Americas and articles on the colonial baroque, Spenser's Faerie Queene, the Puritan poet Ann Lock, and Shakespeare's The Tempest. He has also published on modern and contemporary poetry, especially the experimental traditions of the Americas, and the literary and cultural expressions of contemporary Latinity in Chicano, Puerto Rican, and Cuban-American poetry as well as their counterparts in Latin America. Currently, he is completing a book entitled Five Words about the early modern cultural semantics of the following words in several languages: blood, invention, language, resistance, and world.
Organized by Michelle Clayton, Anna More, & Maite Zubiaurre. Co-sponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

“Early Modern Tongues and Languages,” Critical Perspectives on Luso-Hispanic Studies, Lecture Series
November 28, 2006

Roland Greene (English and Comparative Literature and Head of the Division of Literatures, Cultures and Languages, Stanford University) presents a seminar on “Early Modern Tongues and Languages”. Professor Greene's research has addressed the problems and opportunities of comparative literature, focusing particularly on interactions among transatlantic and hemispheric literatures and cultures. Recent work in early modern studies includes Unrequited Conquests: Love and Empire in the Colonial Americas and articles on the colonial baroque, Spenser's Faerie Queene, the Puritan poet Ann Lock, and Shakespeare's The Tempest. He has also published on modern and contemporary poetry, especially the experimental traditions of the Americas, and the literary and cultural expressions of contemporary Latinity in Chicano, Puerto Rican, and Cuban-American poetry as well as their counterparts in Latin America. Currently, he is completing a book entitled Five Words about the early modern cultural semantics of the following words in several languages: blood, invention, language, resistance, and world. Organized by Michelle Clayton, Anna More, & Maite Zubiaurre. Co-sponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

CMRS Roundtable, “Ritual in Images in Medieval Liturgical Manuscripts”
November 29, 2006

Professor Eric Palazzo (Director of the Center for Advanced Study of Medieval Civilization, University of Poitiers). View pictures >>

“Savonarola: God and Politics in Renaissance Italy”
November 29, 2006
A lecture by Lauro Martines (Professor Emeritus, History, UCLA). Co-sponsored by the Department of Italian and the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. View pictures >>

“‘The filigree hiding the gothic’. The Malatesti: The Books, the Sword, the Women, and their Pope”
November 30 - December 2, 2006

This conference will explore the complex web of contradictory opinions concerning the Malatesti through the centuries by examining all aspects of their history: the military and political skills that allowed an unknown family from the town of Verucchio to become the masters of many cities in Romagna and the March of Ancona; their relationship with the papacy, which culminated in pope Pius II’s excommunication of Sigismondo Malatesti; and their patronage of the arts, especially on the part of Sigismondo in Rimini and Novello Malatesti in Cesena. Although not as well-known as families such as the Medici or Gonzaga, the Malatesti occupy a central position in the history of the Italian Renaissance. In Inferno V, Dante recounts the tragic story of Paolo Malatesti and Francesca da Polenta, one of the most famous episodes of the Divine Comedy. Pope Pius II, in his Commentaries, devotes a long section to the “unspeakable crimes” of Sigismondo Malatesta, lord of Rimini, a man gifted with eloquence and great military skill, who “surpassed every barbarian in cruelty … the worst of all men who have lived or ever will live, the shame of Italy, the disgrace of our age.” Four hundred years later, historian Jakob Burckhardt considered the same Sigismondo the crowning figure among “the furtherers of humanism,” equally capable in war and art, unscrupulous, cruel, and yet refined, in other words, the epitome of the new man capable of changing the course of civilization, and of ushering in the age of modernity. Ezra Pound’s description of Sigismondo in his “Malatesta Cantos” as the “filigree that hides the gothic” takes us back to Burckhardt’s definition of the Italian Renaissance as a time of physical violence and artistic delicacy, and of Sigismondo Malatesti as the source of one of the highest cultural achievements of the West. Co-sponsored by the Ahmanson Foundation, the UCLA Department of Italian, the Italian Cultural Institute of Los Angeles, and the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. View pictures >>

Annual Hammer Foundation Lecture, “Giordano Bruno's Heroic Madness”
December 7, 2006
Poet-philosopher Giordano Bruno (1548-1600) was burned at the stake for heresy in Rome in 1610. His dialogue, De Gli Heroici Furori, was written at the end of a stay in Elizabethan England. It includes more than seventy poems which pose special difficulties for a translator, while offering a summary of his life and thought. Professor Ingrid Rowland (School of Architecture, University of Notre Dame) discusses the difficulties, the dialogue, and the author. View pictures >>

“Byzantine Chant: Early Music or Living Tradition?”
December 8, 2006
Dr. Alexander Lingas from the Department of Music at City University, London presents a lecture. Co-sponsored by CMRS and the UCLA Department of History. View pictures >>

 

Fall 2009 Winter 2010 Spring 2010
Fall 2008 Winter 2009 Spring 2009
Fall 2007 Winter 2008 Spring 2008
Fall 2006 Winter 2007 Spring 2007
Fall 2005 Winter 2006 Spring 2006
Fall 2004 Winter 2005 Spring 2005
Fall 2003 Winter 2004 Spring 2004
Fall 2002 Winter 2003 Spring 2003
Fall 2001 Winter 2002 Spring 2002
Fall 2000 Winter 2001 Spring 2001

 

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